The institution identifies expected outcomes, assesses the extent to which it achieves these outcomes, and provides evidence of improvement based on analysis of the results in the following area:
 community/public service within its educational mission.

Compliance Judgment:  In compliance

Narrative

Through ongoing assessment of outcomes of each unit engaged in public service, documentation of the analysis of assessment results to inform improvements, and institution-wide recognition of improvements through the use of assessment results, East Carolina University (hereafter ECU or the institution) is in compliance with the requirements of SACS comprehensive standard 3.3.1.5: public service related to mission.

This narrative contains the following sections to support compliance:

I.                    History of Public Service at ECU

II.                  Organization of Public Service at ECU

III.                Planning and Assessment of Public Service

IV.                Service to the Community

V.                  Community Engagement

VI.                Recognition of ECU’s Public Service

Evidence of compliance is described in the narrative that follows and summarized in three tables which are introduced and fully elaborated upon in designated sections provided later in the narrative:

Table 1: Recommendations from ECU Carnegie team

Table 2: Key Public Service Accomplishments 2009-2010

Table 3: Assessment Units and Reports - Public Service

Table 4: Alignment of Assessment Units to Strategic Directions

Table 5: Assessment Methods for Public Service Units

Table 6: Quality Improvement Codes Used

Table 7: Use of Results by Strategic Directions

Table 8: Summary of Use of Results for Public Service Assessment Units

Table 9: Public Service in College/School Strategic Action Plans

Table 10: Service Learning Courses

Table 11: Strategic Directions Stories

The ECU mission statement is:

To serve as a national model for public service and regional transformation by: 

 

I.   History of Public Service at ECU

Since 1915, ECU’s motto has been Servire or “to serve,” and the institution’s history includes many examples of service to the region and state. ECU’s Regional Development Institute (now incorporated with the Office of Engagement, Innovation and Economic Development) was established in 1964. Its purpose was to utilize university resources and expertise in a wide variety of collaborative projects with local governments, associated agencies and business enterprises in order to promote and enhance economic development and cultural enrichment of the region. Then, in 1990, ECU’s Volunteer and Service-Learning Center (VSLC) began operation with a mission to support faculty involved in service learning pedagogy, to coordinate community partners, and to facilitate student volunteerism. To strengthen the resources available to students relative to public service, in 2011 the VSLC was moved from the Division of Academic Affairs to the Division of Student Affairs. As described in the job description for the new position of Director for the VSLC, the Center is now located in the Department of Student Involvement and Leadership and has as its goal the enhancement of the practices of service-learning and community engagement at East Carolina University.

In 2010, ECU’s Working Group on Community and Public Service reviewed the 2010 ECU Strategic Action Plan and identified ten objectives related to public service:

These objectives serve to emphasize ECU’s role and commitment to public service, focus public service at ECU, and guide resource allocation for public service.

IIOrganization of Public Service at ECU

Although individual units had been collecting unit-specific data prior to 2008, formal institution-wide identification of public service units began in spring 2008 as ECU and its Carnegie Team prepared an application to the Carnegie Foundation for the Community Engagement Classification. As defined in the Final Report: 2008 Carnegie Team, public service includes engagement [outreach, partnerships, and academic service (service learning, practica, field or clinical work, and internships)] and service to the community [volunteerism, co-curricular service, and extracurricular service].

The report from the ECU Carnegie Team to the ECU Academic Council included a series of recommendations related to public service at ECU. The Council appointed the Engagement Planning Team to address the recommendations and determine action steps. Those recommendations, actions, and results were as follows:

Table 1: Recommendations from ECU Carnegie Team

Recommendation

Action

Result

Make a commitment to foster internal and external collaboration around public service

Communicate with ECU Engagement Team monthly. Publish information about public service at ECU

Between August 2010 and May 2012, 21 email reports to Engagement Team; 5 articles in the Daily Reflector, 2 in the News and Observer, 1 on You Tube, 10 articles in ECU news media;

Distribution of 100 Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy and 300 Office of Engagement, Innovation and Economic Development brochures; 78 presentations about ECU public service at national conferences. Initiation of a research study titled “Communicating Engagement.”

Develop processes to centralize data collection, analysis and quality improvement

Review availability of institutional data re: public service and modify when appropriate

August 2010 establishment of public service assessment units. January -June 2011 review of data bases for faculty public service, funding of public service, and outcomes of unit/institutional public service. March-May 2012 Sedona Task Force revised definitions for the Service area in Sedona. April 2012 Public Service Assessment units agreed to create a data repository for public service in TracDat.

Implement a set of common definitions for terms related to engagement and outreach

 

Definitions posted on appropriate websites, distributed to ECU colleges

Adoption of ECU definitions. Definitions used for the Scholarship of Engagement Award and in the revisions to the tenure and promotion guidelines.

Address faculty, staff and student development and recognition needs

Develop Academies and symposia to educate faculty and students about community engagement

 

Since spring 2009, 40 faculty & 48 student graduates of Engagement & Outreach Scholars Academy; Three Scholarship of Engagement Symposiums; Continuation of Service Learning Conference; Scholarship of Engagement Award established & awarded 2011 and 2012; Tenure and Promotion polices revised to include the scholarship of engagement. In 2011 the ECU EC Scholars joined the Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy through the EC Scholars Research Internship. These ten undergraduate students participated in an academic class focused on engaged scholarship and partnered with EOSA faculty and graduate students to conduct engaged research. In 2012, the ECU Leadership Collaborative and the new Office of Public Service and Community Relations began discussions of about the linkages between public service and leadership development at ECU. As described in the Leadership Newsletter, the 2012 Fall Leadership Forum will focus on servant leadership and will tie public service and leadership together.

Implement a model that coordinates, evaluates and develops quality improvement plans for public service

Review & revise current ECU infrastructure as part of SACS Reaffirmation Process

In March 2012 the Office of Public Service and Community Relations was created and place in the Chancellor’s Division. The Director implemented 3 initiatives: the development of an Enterprise Model to form the basis of the office, listening sessions to inform strategic action plan development, and a Monitoring and Measuring Community Engagement Workshop on June 11, 2012.

Provide a mechanism for community feedback about public service

Planning for Public Listening Sessions underway

In March 2012 due to ECU reorganization, Community Relations was integrated into the Office of Public Service and the first community listening sessions will begin in August 2012.

 

In 2012 ECU created (within the Chancellor’s Division) the Office of Public Service and Community Relations. The purpose of this office is to coordinate ECU’s public service efforts. The office is responsible for strategic planning, strategic assessment, and quality improvement of the university’s public service endeavors.  The office provides a centralized administrative infrastructure and works with senior administration, deans and directors, faculty, staff, and students to develop a collaborative environment in order to accomplish ECU’s public service mission.

The Office of Public Service and Community Relations developed a process for input into an ECU Strategic Action Plan for Public Service. The plan was based on feedback from a series of focus groups to develop strategic goals, objectives and operational strategies. The participants in these focus groups included faculty and staff from three listening sessions, members of the 2012 Student Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy, the staff from the Volunteer and Service Learning Center, and members of the Faculty Service Learning Committee. An analysis of focus group data identified four core processes (Development of faculty/staff/community, Community Relations, Quality Improvement, and Marketing) and six enabling processes (measuring, monitoring, communicating, integrated planning, problem solving, and risk management) for the new office.

III.  Planning and Assessment of Public Service

Prior to 2010, public service units and colleges reported their public service activities through unit annual reports. Examples of annual reports include: Research and Graduate Studies 2007, 2008 and 2009, the Harriot College of  Arts and Sciences (HCAS 2009-2010 Annual Report), College of Human Ecology (CHE 2009-2010 Annual Report), the College of Fine Arts and Communication (CFAC Annual Report 2009-2010), and the Health Sciences Division (HSD Annual Report 2009-2010). Examples of key accomplishments from the 2009 reports are summarized in the table below.

Table 2: Key Public Service Accomplishments 2009-2010

Division/College

Key Public Service Accomplishments 2009/2010

Division of Research and Graduate Studies

Center for Sustainable Tourism conducted three national webinars for tourism businesses on energy conservation and renewable energy

Center for Health Disparities involved in over 50 community health education activities across 22 counties

ECU Outreach Network assisted 9 communities in grant development

Harriot College of Arts and Sciences

Faculty implemented and evaluated a project to train Latino community lay health advisors

Provided testing for over 43,000 students via the North Carolina Early Mathematics Placement Testing Program

Sponsored Peace.Love.Pirates.Cure, a cancer awareness fair

College of Human Ecology

Registered dietitians Elizabeth Wall-Bassett and Nancy Harris and their students are helping the Commonwealth of Dominica develop a sustainable strategy on public health 

Roman Pawlak, assistant professor of nutrition, recently conducted nutrition seminars with Polish-Americans in Chicago.  Polsat 2, a global Polish media network, captured this story about Dr. Pawlak and aired it on the news program "Oblicza Ameryki" (Faces of America)

Professor Hunt McKinnon's interior design sophomore studio class recently completed renovation designs for historic retail buildings in Downtown Rocky Mount, N.C. The class worked closely with the city’s development manager and citizens to create trendy new plans for the buildings

College of Fine Arts and Communication

East Carolina University School of Music and St. Paul’s Episcopal Church partnered in 2009 to bring organist Andrew Scanlon to Greenville to teach organ and sacred music at ECU and serve as organist-choirmaster at Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church

The Suzuki Outreach Program at Wahl-Coates Elementary School in Greenville at the Bath Elementary School in Bath was started to give the at-risk four year olds there an opportunity to study the violin

Division of Health Sciences

The East Carolina Center for Nursing Leadership (ECCNL) received a $20,000 BB&T Leadership Enhancement Grant to support student leadership development.  The ECCNL has worked extensively in Onslow, Jones, Greene and Lenoir counties through rural nursing councils as part of the RWJ/NWHF PIN project grant to build leadership capacity in nursing 

The first three Community Service Learning Center sites were identified last year and our ECU facilities team and an architectural firm are creating a master design for our Community Service Learning Center sites

 

 

Formalized assessment plans with quality improvement strategies for public service units were first developed in 2010. To verify that all units responsible for public service were included in the assessment process, the inventory of Centers and Institutes was checked against the reports of Deans and Directors. A Public Service Working Group was formed to review the inventory and provided justification for any centers/institutes that were not appropriate for inclusion in the assessment processes related to Public Service. ECU’s Institutional Planning, Assessment and Research staff reviewed the missions of units on campus and compared the missions to the definition for public service. As noted in Table 3: Assessment Units and Reports - Public Service there is currently a total of 22 public service units identified through these processes and that are accountable for their own quality improvement (in contrast to those that are evaluated as a part of a larger unit). This table provides a link to each unit’s assessment report (including outcomes, means of assessment, criteria for success, results, and actions taken). Twenty one of those represent the units originally identified by the Public Service Working Group. In 2012 the North Carolina Coastal Studies Institute was removed from ECU’s inventory of public service assessment units due to a UNC system presidential mandate, described in a letter from UNC System President, Thomas Ross. In March of 2012 the new of office of Public Service and Community Relations was established. Therefore, there are 22 public service units currently in the ECU inventory.

By spring 2011, 22 Public Service Assessment Plans were completed using a standard template and then evaluated using the following process: 1) Dyads from the Public Service Working Group reviewed the plan of another unit and provided feedback, 2) After revisions in response to the review, the plans were sent to the unit head for review and editing, 3) A final edit was completed and sent to the appropriate vice chancellor for approval.  Approved plans were then sent to the Institutional Planning, Assessment and Research Outcomes Assessment Coordinator for entry into TracDat, the ECU data repository system.

In June 2011 and April 2012, the public service assessment units met to review the TracDat data and discuss areas of improvement and modifications to the assessment plans. Modifications were then recorded in TracDat, used to continue the assessment process reported below, and inform ECU’s new Public Service and Community Relations Strategic Action Plan. Subsequent to the June and April meetings, all public service assessment units met with the chair of the Public Service Working Group to discuss their assessment and quality improvement implementation timelines. The Public Service Assessment Units Plans demonstrate alignment to the ECU strategic directions as reported in Table 4: Alignment of Assessment Units to Strategic Directions.

The means of assessment utilized by the 22 public service units included (as appropriate): frequency counts, registration/attendance records, number and type of publications/presentations/grants, pre/post tests, changes in wait lists, review of minutes/charts, annual reports, evidence of professional development, surveys, and logic models. These approaches, in the collective, demonstrate a broad range of assessment methods as illustrated in Table 5: Assessment Methods for Public Service Units.

Table 3: Assessment Units and Reports – Public Service for community/public service units for the past two cycles indicate that 100% of the 22 stand-alone service units completed formalized assessment plans in spring 2011 and 2012.

The Public Service Working Group members reviewed assessment data and identified the types of changes implemented for ongoing quality improvement. These changes (as appropriate) were then identified through codes: Revised Service, Revised Process, Implemented New Policy, Implemented New Process, Informed Resource Allocation, Changed Assessment, Changed Criteria, Consultant/Contractual Labor, Development/Training, Other, and No Action Reported. From 2010 to 2012, 22 public service units recorded improvements based on a uniform coding system, with the most common change identified as a ­­­­­Revised Service. Table 6: Quality Improvement Codes Used summarizes the quality improvement codes by unit.

Based on ECU’s mission-intent strategic directions, the Public Service Assessment Working Group developed a process for selecting representative examples of how assessment results were used to improve public service. The Chair of the Working Group and a data analyst reviewed the reports for 2010/2011 and 2011/2012 and selected examples within each of the five strategic directions. This emphasizes the integration of the public service units and the ECU mission and strategic directions.

Table 7: Use of Results by Strategic Directions

Strategic Direction

Assessment Unit

Use of Results

Education for a New Century

The Center for Science, Math and Technology (now the Center for STEM Education) works with teachers and organizations to support STEM education and careers.

In 2011 the Center used the assessment process to inform resource allocation to programs and grant projects such as an Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) grant for Stem education through robotics support for girls, and a NIH FoodMASTER grant to support mathematics and science education using food.

The Leadership University

The Center for Nursing Leadership completed and expert review of the Leadership Education Model and embedded it into the proposed undergraduate nursing curriculum.

In 2012 the Center will pilot test the model in a nursing course in the fall to determine how well it improves leadership skills in participants.

Health, Health Care and Medical Innovation

The NC Agromedicine Institute implemented AgriSafe clinics and Certified Safe Farm programs.

In 2011 the increase in Institute programs resulted in 36 certifications resulting in a collaborative prevention/intervention program that increased agricultural occupation safely and health.

 

Economic Prosperity in the East

Small Business Institute partners students from the College of Business with the regional small business community to improve the effectiveness of the business while expanding the educational experience for ECU students.

In 2011 the Institute added assessment methods and criteria to determine the effectiveness of this experiential learning for the students.

Arts, Culture and Quality of Life

The Center for the Liberal Arts uses the Hariott Voyages of Discovery series to assist in the development of a culturally vibrant service region.

In 2012 the Center increased attendance in 2011/2012 by 684 participants due to a change in marketing strategies.

 

While the full inventory of assessment plans (including results and actions) is contained in Table 3, select examples highlighting the variety and creativity employed in the use of results to improve public service at ECU are summarized in Table 8: Summary of Use of Results for Public Service Assessment Units. The chosen examples range from implementation of new policies and procedures to revision of previous ones. Other examples focus on new types of services or requests for additional resources.

Periodic review of public service units that are also research centers and institutes is mandated by ECU’s Centers and Institutes policy governing the establishment and continuation of centers and institutes.  To date, the committee has reviewed and made recommendations for all new centers and institutes. In addition, the committee considers requests for changes, e.g., name change or reporting structure change. Those centers and institutes located within the Division of Research and Graduate Studies submit an annual report that forms the basis of an annual review by the Vice Chancellor for the Division.  In addition, external review has been conducted for the largest of these entities (Institute for Coastal Science and Policy) and several related centers (RENCI@ECU and the Center for Sustainable Tourism).  In this particular review Dr. Susan Avery, President and Director of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, provided valuable feedback on the performance and organization of ECU’s coastal studies capacity. Reviews of centers and institutes outside of the Division occur on an ad hoc basis within the appropriate college or division.

In addition to the public service assessment units, College/School Strategic Action Plans include public service. The following table summarizes the colleges/schools that reported assessment data, public service goals, and public service objectives in the ECU Strategic Action Plan.

Table 9: Public Service in College/School Strategic Action Plans

 

Strategic Direction

Strategic Objective

College Plans Addressing Objective

The Leadership University

Build upon ECU’s engagement mission to develop student leaders who serve their communities

College of Business

College of Education

 

Extend leadership development activities to support rural communities and underserved populations

College of Business

College of Education

Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences

 

Leverage ECU’s Carnegie classification to raise awareness of the institution's innovative model for leadership and engagement

College of Business

 

Health, Health Care and Medical Innovation

Expand access to health services for North Carolinians by creating and implementing innovative service models

Center for Health Disparities Research

 

Economic Prosperity in the East

Prioritize and invest in programs that address pressing regional issues

College of Business

College of Education

College of Nursing

Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences

College of Technology and Computer Science

 

Enhance Inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary collaborations and partnerships with industry, education, government, and communities

College of Human Ecology

College of Business

Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences

 

Enhance social, environmental, and economic vitality by leveraging our core engagement, research, education and outreach enterprises

College of Business

 

Arts, Culture and Quality of Life

Strengthen regional access to learning opportunities in the arts

College of Fine Arts and Communication

 

Partner to improve the preparation of PreK-12 teachers and support arts and humanities education in the public schools

College of Fine Arts and Communication

 

Nurture lifelong partnerships to stimulate the local creative economy

College of Fine Arts and Communication

College of Human Ecology

 

IVService to the Community

ECU faculty, staff, and students perform service to various communities through continuing education, co-curricular service, extra-curricular service, and volunteerism. Programs relating to continuing education, co-curricular service, and extracurricular service are described in Comprehensive Standard 3.4.2. ECU faculty volunteer in the community, and this data is reported in Sedona Service Data (Sedona is the database faculty use to report annually on their activities) as community service activities. In addition to community service activities conducted in the previous academic year, the 2011-12 Annual Reports Summary: Service describes professional service activities and service to the university.

Based on a summary of Sedona service data from 2009-2012, the most frequently reported activities were categorized as “other” which included professional development workshops for the public, coordinating children’s programs, participation in community health screenings, mentoring minority students who are interested in ECU, etc.

ECU’s Servire Society recognizes faculty, staff, and students who have committed 100 or more hours of volunteer service to the community external to ECU during the period from January through December.  From 2008-2012 Servire Society inductees total 203. All inductees receive a formal Certificate of Recognition and a specially-designed pin as symbols of having been selected for membership. The Servire committee has discussed ways to improve its outreach in order to engage more individuals. In 2012 the committee solicited nominations using additional web sites, email addresses, and new media. The committee invited former faculty and staff inductees to a reception to encourage submission of a new membership application. Based on a trend analyses of Servire Society inductees by year, student numbers have fallen since 2009. The Servire committee believes that the number of students who serve the community has not necessarily changed, rather fewer are applying for Servire recognition. The committee is reviewing strategies to increase student applications.

V.  Community Engagement

Partnerships

Baseline data on ECU community partnerships were collected for the Carnegie application for the Community Engagement Classification. In 2011 the Public Service Working Group reviewed the fifteen campus-community partnerships included in the Carnegie application and found fourteen partnerships still in existence (partnership grid).  The Public Service Working Group considered the role of the scholarship of outreach and engagement (SOE) in ECU’s mission of public service, the development of sustained partnerships, and the education of graduate students.  The working group identified the ECU Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy (EOSA) (located within the Chancellor’s Division) as a major contributor to the SOE. The Academy prepares faculty and students to partner with external communities and to conduct research on issues important to the communities. EOSA engaged research projects involve Academy faculty and graduate students and are directly related to ECU’s mission and strategic action plan.  By the spring of 2012, 41 faculty instituted community-built research projects with 46 EOSA community partners. These projects directly addressed issues identified by communities and resulted in scholarly products including 30 published manuscripts, 127 presentations, and 7 grant applications. ECU acknowledges the work of faculty in engaged research through the institution’s Scholarship of Engagement Award. This award recognizes achievement in the scholarship of engagement and provides a sustained commitment to partnered scholarly endeavors with communities.

Outreach

ECU’s Office of Engagement, Innovation and Economic Development (OEIED) is the primary university administrative unit charged with aligning and engaging ECU’s resources to foster growth in industry sectors that can: bring new jobs and financial investment to eastern North Carolina, drive successful and sustainable economic transformation, and provide critically needed resources and direct technical assistance to underserved, limited-resource, limited-capacity communities.

Academic Service

ECU has an active group of faculty focused on using service-learning (SL) as a pedagogical tool. Service-learning is a method of instruction that has the dual benefits of meeting academic course objectives and helping students develop a greater sense of engagement and social responsibility. A 2008 Faculty Senate resolution (approved by the Chancellor) established a SL course designation when a faculty member documented that the course met the following criteria:

The following table reports the breakdown of ECU’s designated service learning courses and a snapshot of student service-learning courses.

Table 10: Service-Learning Courses

 

 

Students

Sections

Faculty

Departments

Service-Learning Designated

Graduate

Sections

Undergrad

Sections

D.E.

Sections

2007-2008

1,645

80

24

14

N/A

0

80

3

2008-2009

1,167

53

20

10

N/A

2

51

2

2009-2010

1,145

52

20

13

9

4

48

5

2010-2011

2,408

62

27

13

12

3

59

3

 

Prior to 2009, faculty members self-identified a course as service-learning and simply registered their course with the Volunteer and Service Learning Center. As a result of the 2008 Faculty Senate resolution referenced above, ECU implemented a formally articulated service learning course designation in 2009. Clarified and specific criteria explain the reductions in numbers, but Service-Learning designated courses now are more consistently and demonstrably identified.

In addition to service learning, students are engaged in curricular service to the community through practica, fieldwork, and clinical placements. These activities are covered in Comprehensive Standard 3.4.7.

ECU supports the involvement of undergraduate students in public service and has administered the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) multiple years.  The NSSE is a widely used instrument that measures the degree of engagement of college undergraduates in a broad range of activities and experiences during their freshmen and senior college years, and the NSSE Results by Domain and Year Related to Community/Public Service and Institutional Effectiveness (SACS Principle 3.3.1.5) summarizes the most recent data. The most current ECU mean results from 2012 are compared to results from Southeast Public institutions and from institutions in the same Carnegie Class. In 2012 18% of responding freshman year students frequently participated in service learning or community-based projects during a given year, and 92% participated in community service or volunteer work. By their senior year, 25% of responding students have participated in service learning or community based projects, and 84% have participated in community service or curricula related volunteer work.

The Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (FSSE) is designed to collect data on how faculty perceive the community engagement of their students, the significance of different learning and growth areas, faculty-student relations, and time-management skills of the faculty member. The FSSE was conducted at ECU for the first time during Spring 2009 with 295 out of 695 faculty responding. According to a summary report of faculty respondents on the Faculty Survey of Student Engagement, 18% of freshman year students contributed often or very often to the welfare of the community; by their senior year, 35% of students contributed. Faculty respondents perceived 12% of freshmen year students participated in community based learning, they perceived 27% of senior year students participated.

VI.  Recognition of ECU’s Public Service

ECU’s public service activities contribute in many ways to student learning outcomes and have positive community impacts. The Telling Our Story initiative collects and stores published articles related to each strategic direction and ECU’s public service mission. Representative stories related to public service and outreach are listed in the following table: 

Table
11: Strategic Directions Stories

Unit

Story Title and Link

Education for a New Century

COE - Center for Science, Math, & Technology

Camp Hopes to Fuel Science, Math Interest in STEM2 Girls

SODM - Office of Clinical Affairs

Dental School Receives Federal Grant for Telemedicine

The Leadership University

COE - AmeriCorps/Project Heart

Project HEART helps Teens Aim Higher

Chancellor's Division - Office of Public Service and Community Relations

Engaged. Students Learn Through Public Service

Economic Prosperity in the East

TECS - Center for Innovation in Technology and Engineering

Reaching Out. ECU Faculty Partner with Region on Technology

Division of RGS - Engagement, Innovation & Economic Development

ECU Partnership Stimulates Economic Development Across the Region

Health, Health Care & Medical Innovation

BSOM - Pediatric Healthy Weight Research and Treatment Center

Take Off 4-Health Camp Provides Tools for Healthy Living

SODM - Office of Clinical Affairs

ECU Receives Grant for Dental Centers in Ahoskie, Elizabeth City

 

ComprehensiveStandard3.4.2, Continuing Education/Public Service, includes additional information pertinent to public service and not duplicated elsewhere in this narrative.

Through the achievement of the focal point of our mission statement, “to serve as a national model for public service,” East Carolina has obtained national recognition for our work in community and public service.  ECU has been a member of Campus Compact since 2003 and is recognized for its work in service learning and civic engagement. In 2008 the Carnegie Foundation awarded ECU the Community Engagement Classification in recognition of ECU’s public service accomplishments identified in the institution’s Carnegie application. In 2010 ECU was invited to join the National Outreach Scholarship Conference (NOSC) membership, the first non-land grant institution to become a member as articulated in the NOSC Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The state of North Carolina recognized ECU faculty with the University of North Carolina system Board of Governors Public Service Award in 2008 and 2011. This award serves to identify, encourage, recognize, and reward distinguished public service and outreach by faculty across the university system, of which ECU is a constituent institution. The Lucille W. Gorham Intergenerational Community Center (created through a partnership of East Carolina University, the City of Greenville, Pitt Community College, and multiple community partners) submitted a Magrath Application for review, and in May of 2012, ECU received notification that the partnership was a regional finalist for the C. Peter Magrath Community Engagement Award, which recognizes the outreach and engagement partnership efforts of four-year public universities.

Summary

In summary, it is clearly demonstrated that ECU is a national model for public service and regional transformation for the following reasons:

ECU meets its public service mission through engagement (academic service, outreach and partnerships) and service to the community (co-curricular service, extracurricular service and volunteerism). Twenty-two public service assessment units implemented an assessment planning process and recorded quality improvement measures. In addition to these units, ECU’s public service mission is addressed through continuing education, colleges, schools, and other units as reported in Comprehensive Standard 3.4.2. Assessment at the institutional level is a demonstrated priority, and the new Office of Public Service and Community Relations is accountable for evaluating data and documenting institutional quality improvement measures and commensurate quality improvement relative to public service.

 
Documentation

Reference Title

Location

2007 RGS Annual Report

2008-RGS-annual-report

2008 Board of Governors Public Service Award

2008

2008 RGS Annual Report

2008-RGS-annual-report

2009 RGS Annual Report

2009-RGS-Annual-Report

2010 ECU Strategic Action Plan

2010_ECU_Strategic_Action_Plan-2

2011 Board of Governors Public Service Award

2011

2011-12 Annual Reports Summary

2011-12 Annual Reports Summary

Board of Governors Public Service Award

Board of Governors Public Service Award

C. Peter Magrath Community Engagement Award

C. Peter Magrath_Kellogg Award

Camp Hopes to Fuel Science, Math Interest in STEM2 Girls

Girls STEM Camp 7-22-11

Campus Compact

North Carolina Campus Compact

Carnegie Application

Carnegie Application

Carnegie Class

ECU NSSE 2012 Carnegie Class

Centers and Institutes Policy

Executive-Audit Comm  2-24-06

CFAC Annual Report 2009-2010

CFACAnnual Report

CHE 2009-2010 Annual Report

CHE Annual Report

Community Engagement Classification

Community Engagement Classification

Comprehensive Standard 3.4.2

ComprehensiveStandard3.4.2

Comprehensive Standard 3.4.7

Comprehensive Standard 3.4.7

Dental School Receives Federal Grant for Telemedicine

Dental School Grant 6-21-12

Designated Service Learning Courses

Course Listing SL

Director for the VSLC

Director VSLC

Dr. Susan Avery, President and Director of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

ICSP_REVIEW_AVERY_2012

EC Scholars

ECU EC Scholars

EC Scholars Research Internship

EC Scholars Research Internship

ECU Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy (EOSA)

ECU Engagement and Outreach Scholars Acadamy

ECU Mission Statement

ECU Mission Statement

ECU Partnership Stimulates Economic Development Across the Region

Stimulate Economic Development 10-4-11

ECU Receives Grant for Dental Centers in Ahoskie, Elizabeth City

Dental centers grant 1-24-11

Engaged. Students Learn Through Public Service

Scholarship Academy 5-14-12

EOSA Community Partners

Engaged partnerships

EOSA Engaged Research Projects

Engaged Research Projects

Faculty Senate Resolution

Senate resolution SL designation

Final Report: 2008 Carnegie Team

Final Report

Focus Group Data

Analysis of Data

Faculty Survey of Student Engagement

FSSE

HCAS 2009-2010 Annual Report

HCAS annual report

HSD Annual Report 2009-2010

HSD Annual Report

Leadership Newsletter

leadership_Newsletter_Spring2012

Letter from UNC System President, Thomas Ross

Ross Visit Letter March 9 2012

Listening Sessions

Listening Sessions

Magrath Application

Magrath Application 2012 FINAL 2

National Outreach Scholarship Conference Membership

National Outreach Scholarship Conference Membership

NOSC Memorandum of Understanding

NOSC MOU

Notification

Magrath notification

NSSE Results by Domain and Year Related to Community/Public Service and Institutional Effectiveness (SACS Principle 3.3.1.5)

NSSEbySACSprinc-3-3-1-5-(2012)

Office of Engagement, Innovation and Economic Development

Office of Engagement, Innovation and Economic Development

Office of Public Service and Community Relations

Public Service and Community Relations

Partnership Grid

Partnership Grid

Project HEART helps Teens Aim Higher

Project Heart 10-31-11

Reaching Out. ECU Faculty Partner with Region on Technology

Reaching Out 2-20-12

Regional Development Institute

Regional Development Institute

Scholarship of Engagement Award

Scholarship of Engagement Award

Sedona Service Data

Sedona Service_Data Service Activity x College

Service Learning

Service Learning

Servire Society

Servire

Servire Society Inductees

Servire Society Inductees

Servire Society Inductees by Year

Servire  inductees by year

Snapshot of Student Service-Learning Courses

Snapshot of Student Service

Southeast Public Institutions

ECU NSSE 2012 Southeast Public

Summary of Sedona Service Data

Summary Freqency Count

Table 3: Assessment Units and Reports - Public Service

Table 1 Assessment Units Public Service

Table 4: Alignment of Assessment Units to Strategic Directions

Table 3 Alignment of Assessment Units to  Strategic Directions - Public Service

Table 5: Assessment Methods for Public Service Units

Assessment Methods Public Service  April 27 2012

Table 6: Quality Improvement Codes Used

PS Summary of QI Codes Used

Table 8: Summary of Use of Results for Public Service Assessment Units

Table 2 Summary of Use of Results Public Service Assessment Units

Take Off 4-Health Camp Provides Tools for Healthy Living

Take Off 4 Health Camp 9-20-11

Telling Our Story

Telling Our Story

Uniform Coding System

Uniform Coding System

Volunteer and Service-Learning Center

Volunteer and Service Learning Center