The institution identifies college-level general education competencies and the extent to which students have attained them.


Compliance Judgment:  In compliance

Narrative

At East Carolina University (hereafter, ECU or the institution), the general education requirements are defined by an ECU policy entitled “Goals of the Liberal Arts Foundations Curriculum.” Adoption of the term “foundations” signifies the fundamental purpose of general education at ECU:  to provide students with the educational foundation necessary for civic, professional, and personal success. On April 22, 2008, the ECU Faculty Senate adopted guidelines addressing outcomes assessment of foundations courses, entitled “Guidelines for Outcomes Assessment of Foundations Courses.” Intensive course-based assessment of the Foundations curriculum competencies began in the fall term of 2008. The Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) was administered in 2007-2008 and 2011-2012.

This narrative includes sections that describe college-level general education competencies and an ongoing assessment process that documents the extent to which students have attained them in the following subsections:

I.                     Identifying College Level Competencies

II.                  General Learning Objectives for Foundations Courses

III.                The Assessment Cycle for the Ongoing Quality Enhancement of Foundations Courses

Summary of Evidence

Evidence of compliance is summarized in four tables which are introduced and fully elaborated upon in designated sections provided in the narrative: 

Table 1: Assessment Units and Reports: Foundations

Table 2: Summary of Use of Results in Foundations Units

Table 3: Alignment of Foundations Assessment Units to Strategic Directions

Table 4:  Foundations Assessment Units Aligned to Foundations Goals

 I.                     Identifying College Level Competencies


The “Goals of the Liberal Arts Foundations Curriculum” identifies the college-level competencies of ECU’s general education program.
All courses that receive foundations credit in humanities, arts, basic sciences and basic social sciences must meet three goals: a disciplinary content goal, a research methodology goal, and a “relevance of disciplinary scholarship outside the discipline” goal.  All courses in the required multi-disciplinary areas (Health Promotion and Physical Activity) and competency areas (writing and mathematics) must meet the goals specific to each of these areas stated in the Goals of the Liberal Arts Foundations Curriculum.

 

In order for a course to count towards satisfaction of the foundations requirements, it must be approved by two Faculty Senate committees: the University Curriculum Committee (UCC) and the Foundations Curriculum and Instructional Effectiveness Committee (“FCIEC,” formerly the Academic Standards Committee). The UCC reviews courses for undergraduate credit, and the FCIEC exclusively reviews courses for foundations credit. The UCC reviews course proposals to ensure that all courses that earn academic credit at ECU qualify as freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior college-level courses. The UCC then recommends approval of undergraduate college-level courses to the Faculty Senate.  Thereafter, the Faculty Senate recommends approval to the chancellor. The chancellor has final approval over courses proposed for academic credit.

The FCIEC reviews course proposals when the academic unit in which the course is (or will be) housed requests that the course count towards satisfaction of ECU’s Foundations (general education) Curriculum requirement.

Note:  Units seeking foundations credit for courses submit requests on the Request for Foundations Credit form (example from Geology) which is accompanied by a sample course syllabus (example from Geology)The FCIEC reviews proposals to ensure that approved courses explicitly address the goals of the Foundations Curriculum for their foundations area and address the learning objectives for foundations courses stated in Guidelines for Outcomes Assessment of Foundations Courses. The requesting unit also meets with the University Curriculum Committee.  Courses approved by the UCC that explicitly address identified learning objectives therefore address learning competencies judged to be college-level by the UCC in its approval of the course.  The FCIEC recommends approval for foundations credit to the Faculty Senate. The Faculty Senate recommends approval to the Chancellor. Before granting approval, the chancellor has all proposals for Foundations credit jointly reviewed by the Academic Council.


Example of Foundations Course Approval Process:  Sociology 1010

Approval Process Step

Document

1.       The proposer submits a course proposal form as part of a curriculum revision package to the University Curriculum Committee. The proposer also submits a Request for Foundations Credit Form to the Foundations Curriculum and Instructional Effectiveness Committee.

University Curriculum Committee Course Proposal Form (example from Sociology); Request for Foundations Credit Form (Sociology)

2.       The Foundations Curriculum and Instructional Effectiveness Committee reviews and approves the Foundations credit request.

FCIC  Minutes 1/23/2012

3.       The University Curriculum Committee reviews and approves the proposal.

UCC Minutes 1/26/2012

4.       The Faculty Senate reviews and approves the proposal including the Foundations Credit recommendation.

Faculty Senate Minutes 2/21/2012

5.       The chancellor approves the proposal.

Faculty Senate Minutes 3/20/2012

 
II.                     General Learning Objectives for Foundations Courses

The Faculty Senate approved Guidelines for Outcome Assessment of Foundations Courses (2008) state the following general learning objectives for foundations courses in the humanities, arts, social basic sciences and basic social sciences:

1.  Students shall master the subject matter of one or more of the disciplines in each of the four core areas (humanities, arts, basic sciences, basic social sciences).

2.  Students shall master the research methods utilized in one or more of the disciplines in each core area.

3.  Students shall master an understanding of the relevance of scholarship in the discipline to the matters outside the discipline.

In addition to satisfying the three fundamental objectives in each of the four core areas listed above, students also are required to satisfy knowledge and performance objectives specific to two multi-disciplinary areas (health promotion and physical activity) and two general competency areas (writing and mathematics).

The objectives in the disciplinary, multi-disciplinary, and competency areas identify college-level general education competencies. Individual academic units create discipline-specific learning outcomes aligned with foundations-credit course objectives.

III.                  The Assessment Cycle for the Ongoing Quality Enhancement of Foundations Courses

The Guidelines for Outcome Assessment of Foundations Courses emphasize that the purpose of outcomes assessment is enhancing educational quality and that outcomes assessment for quality enhancement is an ongoing, standard operating procedure at ECU.

Outcomes assessment for quality enhancement requires 

 1.  Identifying desired learning outcomes

 2.  Assessing learning outcomes to identify where improvements in quality are needed or possible,

 3.  Implementing steps to enhance quality,

 4.  Assessing learning outcomes to determine if quality was enhanced, and

 5.  Repeating this cycle in the continuous assessment loop.

Each department or school responsible for offering one or more courses for foundations credit is required to engage in the assessment of either at least one section of each first and second year undergraduate course offered for foundations credit OR 20% of the sections of courses with multiple sections (whichever is greater and whether face-to-face or by distance education).

The overall structure and time-line of the assessment cycle is published in the 2008-2009 “Overview of Assessment Reporting for 2008-09: Academic Programs 2 September 2008” by the office of Institutional Planning, Assessment and Research (IPAR). In fall 2008, assessment workshops facilitated by IPAR were held, in which faculty (in consultation with their unit administrators or administrator appointee) in those units offering Foundations Curriculum courses determined the learning outcomes and assessment method(s) appropriate to the unit.  The emphasis during these workshops was on the assessment process as a process that did not terminate when results were obtained. Results were used to determine what steps will be taken to enhance quality, to confirm that the identified actions are implemented, and to assess in an ongoing manner the effects of implementation.

Implementing Assessment

In October 2008, department and school foundations course assessment plans were forwarded to IPAR. The Foundations working group reviewed those assessment plans and sent its review to the chair of the Foundations Curriculum and Instructional Effectiveness Committee, who forwarded the plans and reviews to IPAR in January 2009. Using the Master Rubric to Evaluate Academic Assessment Plans 2008-2009, the Foundations Assessment Working Group reviewed the plans in January and February 2009.

Currently, Foundations Curriculum assessment plans, results, actions, and follow-up are continuously reported to IPAR by each department and school responsible for foundations courses.

Course-Based Assessment

The Goals of the Liberal Arts Foundations Curriculum identifies Foundation Curriculum goals in each area and courses in which those student learning outcomes are assessed.  For every Foundations Curriculum goal in each area, from fall 2008 through spring 2012, and at least annually, departments and schools conducted one or more learning outcomes assessments per goal area, as depicted in assessment reports included in Table 1 Assessment Units and Report:  Foundations. As documented in Table 2: Summary of Use of Results for Foundations Units, assessment results were used to initiate one or more quality enhancement actions and in some cases follow-up actions, depending on where a department or school was in the assessment cycle for a specific goal.

The following section of the narrative summarizes these activities.  The links (used as headings) are to ECU Assessment Reports, providing student learning outcomes, measures of assessment, results, actions taken and follow-up by units within each core area. In addition, under each type of Foundations Curriculum area the number of assessments, quality enhancements and when appropriate follow-up summaries have been quantified. 

Fine Arts:  ECU Assessment Report  Student Learning Outcome assessments were conducted by the schools of Art, Music, and Theater and Dance.

Goal One: Students will learn the subject matter, the practice, the history, or the appreciation of the subject matter of at least one art form. Students will learn the basic principles and practice in one or more areas of the Arts. They will gain an understanding and develop an informed appreciation of the importance of the Arts to areas of human activity and to life in general. Of 16 assessments, 11 assessment targets were met. Use of results: 15 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning. Four follow-up actions were implemented to date (spring term 2012).

 

Goal Two: Students will learn the creative methods and skills utilized by one or more disciplines in the Arts, or they will learn the research methods used in scholarship addressing the history or appreciation of at least one of the Arts. Students will learn how to identify and critique (i.e., “appreciate” in an informed, scholarly way) the creative persons, processes and products of at least one Arts discipline. Of 11 assessments, 10 assessment targets were met. Use of results:  Ten quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning.

 

Goal Three: Students will learn about the Arts’ contribution to society, to culture and to life in general. Students will learn how the Arts relate to other academic areas and to the non-academic world. Of 11 assessments, 8 assessment targets were met. Use of results:  9 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning.


Humanities:  ECU Assessment Report
  Student Learning Outcome assessments were conducted by the English, Foreign Languages and Literatures, and Philosophy Departments and by the Classical Studies, Great Books, Religious Studies, and Women’s Studies interdisciplinary programs.

Goal One: Students will learn the subject matter of at least one discipline in the humanities. Of 16 assessments, 13 assessment targets were met. Use of results:  18 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning. Two follow-up actions were implemented.

Goal two: Students will learn the research methodology applied by disciplines in the humanities. Of 15 assessments, 9 assessment targets were met. Use of results: 17 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning.

Goal three: Students will learn about the discipline’s contribution to general knowledge Of 17 assessments, 10 assessment targets were met. Use of results:  19 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning.


Basic Sciences:  ECU Assessment Report
Student Learning Outcome assessments were conducted by the Biology, Chemistry, Geology, and Physics Departments.

Goal One: Students will learn the subject matter of at least one core discipline in the Basic Sciences: Students will learn the properties and processes of one or more basic components of the natural world. Of 9 assessments, 4 assessment targets were met. Use of results:  9 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning. Two follow-up actions were implemented.

 

Goal Two: Students will learn the research methodology, principles and concepts required to understand and conduct undergraduate-level research in a basic science.  Students will learn how to identify a problem in the science, how to formulate questions and hypotheses, how to design experiments that isolate variables, how to collect and record data, how to interpret data and make correlations, how to draw conclusions, and how to present the results of these activities in a research paper.  Student learning involves laboratory study, which is important for understanding how science is done, how experiments are carried out, and generally how scientists manipulate the world.   Of 7 assessments, 1 assessment target was met. Use of results:  7 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning.

 

Goal Three: Students will learn about the discipline’s contribution to general knowledge. Students will learn that the Basic Sciences are connected and interdependent, how the Basic Sciences relate to other academic disciplines and to the non-academic world, and the impact of basic science on our culture and on other cultures.  Of 7 assessments, 3 assessment targets were met. Use of results:  7 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning.


Basic Social Sciences:  ECU Assessment Report
Student Learning Outcome assessments were conducted by the Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, Recreation and Leisure Studies, and Sociology Departments and the Security Studies interdisciplinary program.

Goal One: Students will learn the subject matter of at least one discipline in the Basic Social Sciences. Of 32 assessments, 20 assessment targets were met. Use of results: 30 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning.

Goal Two:  Students will learn the research methodology, principles and concepts required to understand and conduct undergraduate-level research in a Basic Social Science. Of 24 assessments, 14 assessment targets were met. Use of results: 23 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning.

Goal Three: Students will learn about the discipline’s contribution to general knowledge. Of 34 assessments, 18 assessment targets were met. Use of results: 18 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning.


Writing Competency Requirement:  ECU Assessment Report
  The English Department is responsible for assessing the writing competency requirement.

ENGL 1100, Writing Competence Foundations requirement: Goal 1: Students will learn to use various heuristic and planning tactics in preparing a written composition. In drafting and revising, they will learn to choose words carefully, exploit English syntax fully, and ensure coherence. They will learn to edit for standard English usage, punctuation, and spelling. They will also become competent in using the computer to perform those processes. Of 3 assessments, 1 met its target. Use of results: 4 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning.

ENGL 1200, Writing Competence Foundations requirement: Students will learn to formulate research questions, identify and search both print and electronic bibliographic indexes, locate resources in the library, and read widely for selected kinds of information.  They will learn to incorporate information gained from the library and other sources into their compositions, citing documents appropriately. Of 4 assessments, none of the assessment targets was met. Use of results: 3 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning. Two follow assessments showed that these actions did not meet their targets. Eight new follow-up actions were initiated to address the latest results. In addition, as elaborated below, the gaps in student learning revealed in part by these assessments will be addressed through the significant curricular changes, substantial upgrades to student support, and expansion of faculty development resources that are all part of ECU’ Quality Enhancement Plan.


Math Competency Requirement:  ECU Assessment Report
  The Mathematics Department is responsible for assessing the math competency requirement.

Goal One, Educational Needs: Students in Foundations Curriculum courses will learn Mathematics that is appropriate to their background and educational needs. Of 1 assessment, the target was not met. Use of results: 1 quality enhancement action was implemented in order to improve student learning. Three follow-up actions were implemented.

 

Goal Two, Exponential and Logarithmic Equations: Science students in Foundations Curriculum courses will learn Mathematics that is appropriate to their science program needs. Of 1 assessment, the target was not met. Use of results: 1 quality enhancement action was implemented in order to improve student learning. Two follow-up actions were implemented.


Health Requirement:  ECU Assessment Report
  The Health Education and Promotion Department is responsible for assessing the health requirement.

Goal One, Development & Understanding of Human Behaviors: Students will develop an understanding of the physical, psychological, and socio-cultural factors and human behaviors that influence human health and affect the major health problems in our society. The physical, psychological and socio-cultural dimensions of health are interrelated. To make informed decisions about how to lead healthy, productive lives, students must have an understanding of these dimensions of health and recognize behaviors and develop skills that will have a positive impact on their well-being and the health of society. Of 4 assessments, 2 assessment targets were met. Use of results: 4 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning.

Goal two, Commitment to Human Health: Students will develop an understanding of the role of knowledge and personal responsibility in fostering a commitment to human health. Acquiring health knowledge and skills enables students to make informed personal health decisions and thereby positively impacts the health of the individual and society. Of 2 assessments, 2 assessment targets were met. Use of results: 2 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning.

Goal Three, Comprehension of Health-Related Activity: Students will develop an understanding of the components of health-related physical activity and their relationship to human health. Knowledge of the components of the health-related physical activities is essential to changing physical activity habits toward more healthful behaviors. The Surgeon General has recognized the centrality of physical activity to maintaining human health. As such, increasing the physical activity of our citizens is a priority national objective. Of 3 assessments, 1 met its targets. Use of results: 3 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning.


Exercise and Sports Science Requirement:  ECU Assessment Report
   The exercise and sports science requirement is assessed by the Exercise and Sports Science Department.

Goal One, Comprehension of Human Behaviors: Students will develop an understanding of the physical, psychological, and socio-cultural factors and human behaviors that influence human health and affect the major health problems in our society. Of 4 assessments, 4 assessment targets were met. Use of results: 3 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning further.

Goal Two, Knowledge of Personal Responsibility: Students will develop an understanding of the role of knowledge and personal responsibility in fostering a commitment to human health. Of 3 assessments, 3 assessment targets were met. Use of results: 3 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning.

Goal Three, Enhancement of Physical Fitness & Lifelong Sport Skills: Students will develop or enhance physical fitness and lifelong sport skills. Of 3 assessments, no targets were met. Use of results: 3 quality enhancement actions were implemented in order to improve student learning.

 

Table 3: Alignment of Foundation Assessment Units to Strategic Directions and Table 4: Alignment of Foundations Assessment Units to Foundations Goals document clear alignment between the foundations units and both the ECU strategic directions and the foundations goals.  Table 3 lists each foundations assessment unit and the strategic directions supported.  The three overarching goals of the foundations curriculum are included in Table 4 with supporting documentation of alignment.  Foundations assessment unit outcomes are included in this table.  A full report for each unit has been included in Table 1.

Collegiate Learning Assessment

The Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) was administered in 2007-2008 (CLA 2007-2008 Institutional Report ) and 2011-2012(CLA 2011-2012 Institutional Report).  The CLA is designed to measure an institution’s contribution, or what the CLA organization terms “value added,” to the development of a student’s ability to think critically, reason analytically, solve problems, and communicate clearly and cogently. The difference between how well freshmen perform (relative to expectations) and how well seniors perform (relative to expectations) determines an institution’s value-added estimate.  Results consist of two types of scores: Performance task scores and Analytic Writing task scores; the Analytic Writing task scores are from the Make-an-Argument and Critique-an-Argument tasks, and the Total score consists of the Performance and Analytic Writing tasks combined. 

In both 2007-2008 and 2011-2012 performance levels reflected in value-added scores were “near” what would be expected at schools with similar entering academic ability.  For example, in 2011-2012 the total value-added score slightly exceeded the “gain” typical of schools whose entering students had similar academic ability.  At ECU the value-added percentile rank for the Total CLA Score in 2011-2012 was slightly higher than that for 2007-2008. The increase in the value-added percentile rank from the forty-second percentile to the fifty-third percentile suggests a slight improvement in learning gains. 
 

CLA Outcomes at ECU from    2011-2012 and 2007-2008

2011-2012

2007-2008

Performance Level

Expected Mean CLA Score

Value-Added Score

Value-Added Percentile Rank

Value-Added Percentile Rank

Total CLA Score

Near

1141

0.07

53

42

Performance Task

Near

1148

0.35

66

45

Analytic Writing Task

Near

1136

-0.28

35

37

 Make-an-Argument

Near

1124

-0.43

28

46

 Critique-an-Argument

Near

1146

-0.05

45

30

 

The CLA coupled with data from the foundations curriculum related to writing are tools being used to target our university writing program. Our proposed QEP, “
Write Where You Belong,” focuses on integrating writing throughout the curriculum. The program seeks to align teaching, learning, and assessment practices in communicating plainly and logically. Connecting the lower division Foundations composition courses with writing in the upper division courses in the major, the program supports Foundations goals and aligns well with the strategic directions outlined in our university strategic plan, ECU Tomorrow. The new writing curriculum will demonstrate clearly for students how important it is for specialists to be able to communicate effectively with one another and with broader audiences. The QEP program developers have outlined a Sophomore Writing Course Initiative (courses that are aimed at helping students achieve the “Writing Competence” goals of the Foundation Curriculum).  Revisions to the Foundations freshman composition sequence are also included in the QEP.  A new version of English 1100 will assist student writers who self-place into it by providing an additional hour of class time that will serve essentially as a "writing lab." In addition, QEP program developers have planned revisions to the Foundations introductory composition course (English 1200) so that students can explore how specialized knowledge gets transmitted to broader national and international audiences. Additional steps taken include establishment of a writing mentors program for ECU and expansion and enhancement of the University Writing Center as described in the 2011-12 progress reports.

The Progress Report:  Writing Instruction Network Initiative summarizes work addressing student writing and communication competencies that was accomplished in 2011-2012 and plans for the coming year including expanding the WAC Academy, expanding Writing Center Services to Faculty, fostering Faculty Learning Communities, activating a Community Partner Outreach and Engagement (Speaker’s Bureau), and sponsoring QEP Faculty Development Seminars on best practices. Given ECU’s Writing Foundations and WI course requirements, through its impact on both Foundations courses and courses in each student’s major, our proposed QEP will affect every student who earns a degree from the university. All departments will be involved in some capacity as each offers WI courses.

Graduating Senior Survey

The General Education Outcomes:  Graduating Senior Survey Results for ECU and the UNC System table presents five years of results for general outcomes from the Graduating Senior Survey (2004, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012) with comparisons between ECU and the UNC system as a whole (note:  UNC system results not available for 2012).  This is spring data from each of those years.  The results are consistently high over these four years with very small differences between ECU and UNC, but ECU’s results are slightly higher than those of the UNC system in each reporting year.  The highest ratings for ECU are in the three most recent results: 2008, 2010, and 2012.

For ECU and the UNC system as a whole, the lowest ratings for general education competencies are in response to the question C1e, the percent of graduating seniors who agreed very much or somewhat that ECU had contributed to their ability to use mathematics skills.  These consistent data (Support for Students in High Enrollment Courses) further support the ECU Department of Mathematics’ proposal to redesign MATH 1065 College Algebra, funded and supported by the institution in spring 2012. The University Space Planning Committee has worked collaboratively with the Office of Institutional Planning to identify and secure almost 4,000 sq. ft. of space in Joyner Library. Students will meet with their instructor in the classroom for one hour per week and will be required to spend an additional three flexible hours in the teacher- and tutor-staffed lab where immediate, personalized support will be available 60 hours a week.  The Math Lab opened in August 2012.

Summary

Through the use of multiple means of assessment, East Carolina University is successful in identifying college-level general education competencies and the extent to which students have attained them.
 


D
ocumentation

Reference Title

Location

2007-08 Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA)

CLA_0708_R_East Carolina University

2011-12 Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA)

CLA_1112 Report_East Carolina University

Basic Sciences:  ECU Assessment Report

Foundations - Basic Sciences

Basic Social Sciences:  ECU Assessment Report

Foundations - Basic Social Sciences

Course-based assessment method

Foundations Goals and Courses

ECU Tomorrow

ECU Tomorrow_ Our Strategic Directions

Exercise and Sports Sciences Requirement

Foundations - Health

Expansion and Enhancement of the University Writing Center

Writing Centers Initiative Progress Report 3-16-12 FINAL

Faculty Senate Minutes 2/21/2012

Fac Sen Meet 2-21-2012

Faculty Senate Minutes 3/20/2012

Fac Sen Meets 3-20 2012

FCIC Minutes 1/23/2012

Found Curr Comm 1 23 2012

Fine Arts:  ECU Assessment Report

Foundations Arts Report

Foundations Curriculum and Instructional Effectiveness Committee

3.5.1 - 7 FCIE

General Education Outcomes:  Graduating Senior Survey Results for ECU and the UNC System table

GSS-Foundations-V2

 

Goals of the Liberal Arts Foundations Curriculum

3.5.1 1 XXXX foundations Goals

Guidelines for Outcome Assessment of Foundations Courses

3.5.1 - 2 YYYY foundations assessment guidelines

Health Requirement:  ECU Assessment Report

Foundations - Health

Humanities:  ECU Assessment Report

Foundations Humanities Report

Master Rubric to Evaluate Academic Assessment Plans 2008-2009

3.5.1 - 5 GGGG master assessment rubric

Math 1065, College Algebra

MATH1065

Math Competency:  ECU Assessment Report

Foundations - Math

Math Lab

Math Lab from Albi_120508

Overview of Assessment Reporting for 2008-09: Academic Programs 2 September 2008

3.5.1 - 4 QQQQ Overview-of-Assessment-Reporting-for-2008

Progress Report: Writing Instruction Network Initiative

Writing Instruction Network Progress Report--March 16 2012

Request for Foundations Credit Form (example from Geology)

3.5.1 - 8 course proposal

Request for Foundations Credit Form (Sociology 1010)

Soci 1010 foundationform_for_race_gender_class_with revisions[1][1]

Sample Course Syllabus (example from Geology)

3.5.1 - 9 syllabus example

Sophomore Writing Course Initiative

Sophomore Course Initiative Progress Report-FINAL

Support for Students in High Enrollment Courses

Support for students in high enrollment courses

Table 1: Assessment Units and Reports: Foundations

Assessment Units Foundations

Table 2: Summary of Use of Results for Foundations Units

Table 2 Foundations Use of Results

Table 3: Alignment of Foundation Assessment Units to Strategic Directions

Table 3 Alignment of Assessment Units to Strategic Directions

Table 4: Alignment of Foundations Assessment Units to Foundations Goals

Foundations Units Aligned to Foundation Goals Table

Progress Report: Writing Instruction Network Initiative

Writing Instruction Network Progress Report--March 16 2012

UCC Minutes 1/26/2012

SOCI 1010 UCC Minutes

University Curriculum Committee (UCC)

3.5.1 - 6 UCC

University Curriculum Committee Course Proposal Form (example from Sociology)

SOCI 1010 courseproposalformWord[2][1]

Write Where You Belong

QEP_White_Paper-Banks,_Eble,_Sharer

Writing Competency:  ECU Assessment Report

Foundations - Writing

Writing Mentors Program for ECU

Writing Mentors Progress Report--March 16 2012 FINAL