An institution includes a review of its distance learning programs in the Compliance Certification.


Compliance Judgment: In compliance

Narrative

East Carolina University (hereafter ECU or the institution) is in compliance with the SACS Policy Statement on Distance and Correspondence Education and has incorporated an assessment of compliance with standards that apply to our distance and correspondence education programs in the Compliance Certification Document.  This section summarizes the case for compliance with all DE-related standards and provides one coherent description of distance education at ECU.

East Carolina’s Policy on Distance Education, approved by the Faculty Senate and the chancellor in 2010 and published in the ECU Faculty Manual, Part VI, Section VII, guides the development, delivery, and assessment of distance education programs at East Carolina University:

Distance Education Policies

Distance education is a formal educational process in which the majority (i.e. more than 50%) of instruction (interaction between students and instructors and among students) in a course occurs when students and instructors are not co-located. Instruction may be synchronous or asynchronous. The course may use internet, closed circuit, cable, fiber optics, DVDs, CD-ROM or other electronic means to communicate  (The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools definition of “distance education”).

 

A. Distance Education Courses and Programs

Programs offered via distance education shall be consistent with the mission of East Carolina University and the academic unit offering the courses or programs. There shall be no distinctions in academic rigor or content between programs offered through distance education and those offered on campus. Development of new online programs and courses will follow the same development and approval procedures as for face-to-face programs and courses (Part V, Section III). Selection of courses and programs to be offered via distance education is the purview of the offering academic unit. The academic units shall provide oversight of programs and courses delivered via distance education to ensure that each is coherent and complete and has learning outcomes appropriate to the level and rigor of the course or program.

 

B. Oversight of Distance Education

The Office of the Provost shall ensure that academic units adhere to the distance education policies described in this section. The faculty assumes primary responsibility for ensuring the rigor of programs and the quality of instruction offered through distance education.

 

C. Courses Delivered by Distance Education

The faculty member teaching a distance education course shall have the same control of content and instruction as in face-to-face courses, consistent with university policies on instruction and academic freedom. Proposals for distance educations courses shall be evaluated at the department or school, college and university level. The faculty member, unit curriculum committees, and the unit administrator play a significant role in guiding the development and implementation of distance education courses. Only those proposals demonstrating suitable content and sufficient quality and rigor shall be approved.

 

Faculty members develop syllabi for distance education courses consistent with the ECU Standards for Online Learning. These standards address learning objectives and other things necessary for student success in distance education courses. The structure of distance education courses and programs reflects consideration of the challenges of time management and the risk of attrition for students in these courses. Course design takes into consideration the need for and importance of interaction between faculty and students and among students.

 

D. Faculty Preparation

All courses offered via distance education shall be taught by a qualified, credentialed faculty member approved and assigned by the unit administrator. Faculty who teach distance education courses and programs shall have the same academic qualifications as faculty who teach face-to-face courses. Each faculty member who teaches one or more distance education courses must complete a university training program. Academic units that wish to develop their own training program must use the university training program until their own training program is approved by the appropriate vice chancellor.

 

Unit administrators are responsible for ensuring that each faculty member teaching distance education courses has the appropriate distance education training. All faculty teaching distance education courses will engage in at least one training activity each academic year that addresses advances in the methodologies and technologies used in distance education. Training is documented in the faculty annual report of each faculty member teaching one or more distance education course. The unit administrator will provide a complete list of faculty members teaching distance education courses and documentation that each faculty member has met the training requirements annually to the Provost’s office.

 

Faculty members teaching a distance education course have access to consultation, implementation, and evaluation support from appropriate supporting units (i.e. Office of Faculty Excellence, IPAR, college Instructional Support Consultants, library services, etc). The University shall provide appropriate equipment, software, and communications access to faculty necessary to provide effective distance education. The University will ensure the availability of continuing faculty education and training to enhance proficiencies in the methodology and the technologies used in distance education.

 

E. Quality Standards

Distance education courses shall comply with the ECU Standards for Online Learning.

 

F. Evaluation of Distance Education

DE Courses and faculty members teaching through distance education are subject to periodic review in addition to the faculty annual evaluation (at a minimum, once every three years). Faculty teaching multiple DE courses will submit only one course for review. Instruction in distance education courses shall be evaluated according to the instruction evaluation procedures in effect for face-to-face courses with appropriate additions consistent with the delivery method, including use of the University Peer Review Instrument for Online Learning or an approved Peer Review Instrument developed by the academic unit. Units that wish to develop their own Peer Review Instrument must use the university instrument until their own instrument is approved by the appropriate vice chancellor. Peer reviewers will be selected based on criteria determined by the faculty of the college, school or department.

 

Student opinion of instruction will be evaluated through an online evaluation specific for distance education courses approved by the Faculty Senate and the chancellor and administered through the Office of Institutional Planning, Assessment and Research.

 

Each distance education academic degree program shall be assessed in the same manner and the same frequency as the unit's assessment of academic programs offered on campus. The unit administrator shall review assessment results with assigned faculty and the departmental faculty to facilitate the continual enhancement of the unit’s distance education program.

 

This narrative summarizes compliance with DE related requirements and standards. Complete documentation and descriptions to support compliance are provided in the narratives of compliance referenced in the heading sections below.  These headings correspond to those in the SACS Guidelines in the Application of the Principles of Accreditation to Distance and Correspondence Education:

Mission 2.4, 3.1.1

If an institution offers significant distance and correspondence education, it should be reflected in the institution’s mission.

ECU Tomorrow: A Vision for Leadership and Service sets forth ECU’s mission, vision, values, five strategic directions, and core competencies (approved by the Board of Trustees, BOT minutes).  The mission reads as follows:

 

To serve as a national model for public service and regional transformation by:

(Approved, UNC Board of Governors, November 2009)

ECU’s first strategic direction as published in “ECU Tomorrow” is Education for a New Century. Increasing access to higher education is seen as one of the university’s core competencies. Listed there are the goals:

As stated in the ECU Policy on Distance Education cited above, “Programs offered via distance education shall be consistent with the mission of East Carolina University and the academic unit offering the courses or programs.”  The university offers distance education programs to fulfill four distinct parts of its mission:

1)      Regional transformation

2)      Preparing our students to compete and succeed

3)      Train and prepare leaders

4)      Transforming health and health care

For more than 65 years, the mission of East Carolina University has included support of courses and degree programs for students located beyond the borders of the campus.   Historically, these off-campus programs were offered at specific sites and outreach centers, often involving the placement of university support staff, teaching faculty, and resources at locations such as military bases and community colleges. 

 

In fall 1947, ECU offered its first class away from the campus.   Courses offered away from the campus grew slowly for 50 years and were completely funded with tuition and fees collected from students.  The number of students grew to several hundred in the late 1990s.  Instructors taught the classes over and above their campus loads and were paid a modest stipend to teach. Out of ECU’s efforts to serve students away from the campus grew a culture of outreach.  It was this culture of outreach in combination with the advent of the Internet and the funding of distance education that placed ECU in a unique position to expand its offerings away from the campus,

 

Some of the university’s milestones include:

 

ECU was said to have one of the first fully online graduate programs (MS in Industrial Technology) in the country.  Early adopters of technology saw the opportunity that was presented by the Internet.  Soon after this, innovative faculty in supportive academic units began adapting courses, and ultimately programs, to be delivered over the Internet. 

 

ECU was one of the four UNC institutions selected to receive funding to pilot DE programs in 1996. With the advances associated with rapidly improving technologies, access to the Internet, and faculty experience in utilizing these resources, the university began a migration away from more intensely site-based instruction and student support services toward electronically supported academic programs.

 

East Carolina University engaged a variety of resources to establish direction, guiding principles, and support systems required to appropriately respond to the state’s commitment to improved access to higher education.  Faculty and administrators provided considerable input. 

 

Major strategies emerging from these planning efforts included:

 

          Commitment to focus on delivery of complete academic programs instead of a random selection of courses

          Commitment to use regular campus faculty, not adjuncts, to deliver most courses

          Investment in student and faculty support services to facilitate development and deployment of academic programs

          Investment in an infrastructure and services to support electronically-offered courses

          Development of a thoughtful planning process prior to approving programs to be offered in distance education format

 

A former chancellor of East Carolina University said, when addressing the press, “Distance education has transformed the way ECU does business.”  Distance education is now at the very core of the way ECU operates.  The DE initiative has brought an added richness and diversity to the institution. DE funding has brought significant numbers of new tenure track faculty members to the campus and has invigorated academic discussions in every academic unit.

 

ECU’s ability to be globally ready, to provide access to all citizens, to improve public education, to serve, transform and sustain the economies of its regions, and to be the major factor in the improvement of healthcare in eastern North Carolina depends is enhanced by the institution’s effective  distance education programs.

 

These Distance Education programs are making East Carolina University’s undergraduate and graduate programs accessible for students.  The Graduating Senior Survey includes the following question:  “If you are earning your degree through an off-campus degree program, how likely is it that you would have obtained this degree on a UNC campus if the off-campus program had not been available?”  As shown in the table Likelihood of Earning a Degree Without an Off-Campus Program, the percentage of graduating seniors from 2006-2012 who report “probably not” or “not likely” from 200-2012 continues to increase. 

A similar question about access is included in the Graduate Student Exit Survey:  “Would you probably have obtained your graduate degree at ECU if an off-campus program from Continuing Studies had not been available?”  As shown in the table Likelihood of Obtaining a Graduate Degree Without an Off-Campus Program without an Off-Campus Program, the percentage of graduate students from 2006-2012 who report “no” has increased each year from 41.2% in 2006-07 to 56.9% in 2011-12. 

­­­­­­­­­­­­­Curriculum and Instruction 2.7.2, 3.2.14, 3.4.1, 3.4.6, 3.4.7, 3.4.10, 3.4.12

       The faculty assumes primary responsibility for and exercises oversight of distance and correspondence education, ensuring both the rigor of programs and the quality of instruction.

       The technology used is appropriate to the nature and objectives of the programs and courses and expectations concerning the use of such technology are clearly communicated to students.

       Distance and correspondence education policies are clear concerning ownership of materials, faculty compensation, copyright issues, and the use of revenue derived from the creation and production of software, telecourses, or other media products.

       Academic support services are appropriate and specifically related to distance and correspondence education.

       Program length is appropriate for each of the institution’s educational programs, including those offered through distance education and correspondence education.

       For all degree programs offered through distance or correspondence education, the programs embody a coherent course of study that is compatible with the institution’s mission and is based upon fields of study appropriate to higher education.

       For all courses offered through distance or correspondence education, the institution employs sound and acceptable practices for determining the amount and level of credit awarded and justifies the use of a unit other than semester credit hours by explaining it equivalency.

       An institution entering into consortial arrangements or contractual agreements for the delivery of courses/programs or services offered by distance or correspondence education is an active participant in ensuring the effectiveness and quality of the courses/programs offered by all of the participants.

 

Responsibility for Curriculum and Instruction

The East Carolina University Faculty Manual Part VI, Section III , Distance Education Policy clearly mandates that faculty assume primary responsibility for, and exercise oversight of, distance education in the same manner and to the same extent as for traditional-delivery courses: 

“Programs offered via distance education shall be consistent with the mission of East Carolina University and the academic unit offering the courses or programs.  There shall be no distinctions in academic rigor or content between programs offered through distance education and those offered on campus. Development of new online programs and courses will follow the same development and approval procedures as for face-to-face programs and courses (Part V, Section III). Selection of courses and programs to be offered via distance education is the purview of the offering academic unit.  The academic units shall provide oversight of programs and courses delivered via distance education to ensure that each is coherent and complete and has learning outcomes appropriate to the level and rigor of the course or program.”

The university does not contract for any of its distance learning program with an outside party to deliver instruction and does not employ “outside experts” to develop and provide distance education courses/programs.

As evidence of student satisfaction with instructional quality, 2006-2012 results from both the Graduating Senior Survey (as required by UNC-GA) and the Graduate Student Exit Survey compare student satisfaction with face-to-face and online instruction.  As shown in the table Comparison of Face-to-Face and Online Instruction in Terms of Ratings of Instructional Quality from the Graduate Student Exit Survey, the percentage of graduate students in 2012 who rated web-based instruction “excellent” or “good” is 89.2% compared with 92.5% who rated face-to-face instruction as “excellent” or “good.”  The table presents similar results from 2006-2007 through 2011-2012.  As shown in the table Comparison of Face-to-Face and Online Instruction in Terms of Ratings of Instructional Quality from the Graduating Senior Survey, the percentage of graduating seniors in 2012 who rated web-based instruction as “excellent” or “good” is 92% compared with 91.5% who rated face-to-face instruction as “excellent” or “good” (results from students who indicated that most of their courses were taught by the instructional mode indicated).  More detailed comparisons of student satisfaction of instructional quality with face-to-face and online instruction are provided in the table Comparison of Face-to-Face(FF) and Online (DE) SOIS Summary Course Rating Means (by semester from fall 2006 through spring 2012), Comparison of Face-to-Face(FF) and Online (DE) SOIS Summary Course Rating Means Matched by Instructor and Course Number (by semester from fall 2006 through spring 2012), and Comparison of Selected Face-to-Face (FF) and Online (DE) Course Rating Means by Semester and Term (fall 2006 through spring 2012).

East Carolina University has a clearly defined organizational structure, which is prominently displayed on its website. These organizational charts outline clearly the major divisions of the university which are headed by vice chancellors and other senior administrators, all of whom report to the Chancellor.

Organizationally at ECU, distance education is considered an instructional modality and as such is administered in the same manner as face to face instruction. Distance education programs and the responsibility for their quality are housed in the academic colleges and departments.  The academic affairs organizational chart reflects the colleges reporting to the Office of the Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor of Academic affairs.   As shown on the organizational chart and detailed in the position description, the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Emerging Academic Initiatives also has delegated responsibilities for distance education.

As evidenced in the faculty manual Faculty Manual, Part VI, Section III , the responsibility for academic programs whether offered on the campus or via distance remains the same. While other institutions have developed separate college or divisions to administer distance education programs, ECU has maintained that all academic programs, regardless of delivery method  be developed and  administered by the academic units that offer them. The hiring, staffing, and credentials review of all faculty are maintained in the individual academic units.

What makes ECU different from many institutions is the breadth of its offerings. Many schools have put the traditional large programs online in search of enrollments. Conversely, ECU has adhered to its mission and provided a cross section of programs that address the needs of the state. Students from across the state have access to programs that were previously unavailable to them; this strategy has propelled ECU to the forefront as the largest UNC distance education institution. Each of the university’s colleges has been active participants in distance education.

The university recognized the unique demands of a significant distance education program and has developed committees and working groups in the true sense of shared governance to help guide and shape policies related to distance education.

The Distance Education and Learning Technology Committee, a standing committee of the faculty senate, reviews program quality and policies and future directions relating to distance education; examines and recommends policies relating to distance education; ensures timely, informed faculty opinion on any technology action in any area that may affect significantly the university’s academic mission; recommends policy related to the academic use of technology; and initiates, reviews, and makes recommendations on proposals to plan, implement, revise or eliminate technology initiatives, goals, standards, policies, procedures or actions that significantly impact the University’s academic mission.

The ECU Distance Education Advisory Council provides a forum for the discussion of current issues in the area of online learning that would be of common interest across the academic units. The discussions include academic pedagogies, practices, activities, and resources in the units. Topics also include pedagogies, policies at the local and state level and the production of documents that are helpful to faculty and administration in the conduct of online learning activities. (These include the university’s Pandemic Plan, the Continuity of Instruction Plan, the Academic Integrity in Online Courses Guidelines, etc.). The committee is chaired by the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Emerging Academic Initiatives, and provides advice to Academic Affairs as needed. Membership includes a dean-appointed representative from each college, each library, each appropriate faculty senate committee, and from ITCS.

ECU’s policies and procedures for establishing, organizing, funding, and managing Distance Education programs  are essentially identical to those outlined for development of academic programs delivered face to face on the campus.  This development process requires appropriate faculty oversight, unit administrative approval, thorough budget reviews and funding plans, university administrative approval, and approval of the UNC General Administration.

The proposals are referred to the Academic Program Development Collaborative Team (APDC Team), an advisory body to ECU’s Academic Council. The Division of Academic Affairs; the Office of Institutional Planning, Assessment and Research; the Graduate School; the Office of Continuing Studies; the Division of Research and Graduate Studies; the Division of Health Sciences, and the Undergraduate and Graduate Curriculum Committees, as well as the Faculty Senate Chair, are represented. A unit proposing a new degree program begins the on-campus review process by presenting the appropriate request to plan and request to establish documents to the APDC Team. The APDC Team advises the Provost and the Dean of the Graduate School on new academic program proposals.

The proposal is then reviewed by the Educational Policies and Planning Committee (EPPC), a standing committee of the Faculty Senate, and then referred to the Academic council. The EPPC oversees the adequacy, balance, and quality of the university's overall undergraduate and graduate programs, and advises the chancellor on educational policies and organizations, goals, standards, and procedures.

The Academic Council includes the provost and senior vice chancellor for academic affairs, the vice chancellor for research and graduate studies, and the vice chancellor for health sciences. The Academic Council considers the APDC Team’s and EPPC recommendations on new academic degree program proposals and makes recommendations to the chancellor.

Appropriate and Effective Use of Technology

The Faculty Manual: Part V, Section IV statesFaculty members develop syllabi for distance education courses consistent with the ECU Standards for Online Learning. These standards address learning objectives and other things necessary for student success in distance education courses. The structure of distance education courses and programs reflects consideration of the challenges of time management and the risk of attrition for students in these courses.  Course design takes into consideration the need for and importance of interaction between faculty and students and among students.”

The ECU Standards for Online Learning include a requirement that minimum technology skills required by the student are clearly stated and resources for technology training are listed in the syllabus.  Thus, student expectations for technology use are a function of the individual course/instructor.

ECU provides a variety of synchronous and asynchronous learning platforms from which faculty members may select to facilitate their stated course learning outcomes. The faculty member then communicates requirements and expectations through course syllabi which are distributed on the first day of classes. This information includes which technologies are used, when they are to be used, and how to access them. The hardware requirements are provided at the ACE website: ACE is the student technology support center, where students receive computer support.

One of ECU’s major commitments is to provide a feature-rich and user-friendly course management system (CMS) to support teaching and learning via distance education.  Course management systems provide many features that enhance teaching and learning.

Since 2004, ECU has conducted two (CMS) studies with faculty and technical support staff to review Blackboard and examine top competing products.  In 2004 ECU reviewed the Blackboard platform and conducted a comparison study with WebCT Vista; the outcome was to continue with Blackboard. 

More recently, in 2007-2008 ECU conducted a learning management system study in which faculty taught semester long courses on three platforms: Blackboard, Moodle, and Sakai.  The studies allowed faculty, students, and support personnel to gain a deeper understanding of each platform’s features, usability, management, and limitations. 

The objective of the CMS Platform Project was to conduct a formal analysis of the three different CMS platforms. In order to have a complete CMS evaluation, the project used input from all stakeholders, including faculty, staff, Instructional Technologist, ITCS, and students. Faculty used three CMS platforms, teaching one course a semester on a different CMS. A rubric was provided to compare/contrast different CMS platforms, and focus groups studied specific aspects of the CMS platforms.

The 2007-2008 study concluded that Blackboard was still the preferred CMS at the time due to a number of factors including: the investment in many existing courses in Blackboard with no easy migration to another CMS, and the cost of additional hardware, support, and training.  The timing of this study also coincided with the Blackboard renewal and concerns were raised about running two parallel production systems for a transition period, thus the decision was made to continue with Blackboard.    

Another primary tool to support the distance education experience is Centra, a hosted solution used for web conferencing.  This hosted web conferencing program provides a virtual classroom, enabling a group of people to interact with one another in a virtual online meeting environment. Centra can be accessed "live" anytime from anywhere that attendees have access to a computer and an Internet connection. All meetings using Centra are automatically recorded, so those unable to make the live meeting are able to playback the meeting at a later time. ECU’s platform is hosted by Saba, which provides the institution with the ability to hold an unlimited number of meetings 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Centra’s server currently stores recordings for over 7,000 meeting events and accommodates over 8,000 active users.

Other tools that aid in the success and use of resources include communication tools, where students can communicate with professors and peers through their ECU Outlook Live e-mail accounts. This e-mail system, powered by Microsoft, also provides a chat component that allows students to communicate with instructors using Microsoft Communicator. In addition, Outlook Live also enables students to use Microsoft Office Web Apps for free and provides students with online storage space for course-related and personal files, photographs, and more.  Additional resources include Piratedrive space for file storage and SharePoint collaborative workspace.

Ownership of Materials and Copyright Issues

East Carolina University has as its primary purposes teaching, research, and the expansion and dissemination of knowledge.  Products of these activities include development and use of copyrightable materials.  The creation of copyrightable materials in the form of literary, dramatic, and other intellectual works by the university community is encouraged as a measure of productivity and commitment to the dissemination of knowledge and creative activity for public benefit.  It is the policy of this university that its faculty, staff, and students carry out their scholarly work in an open and free atmosphere that encourages publication without constraint, consistent with applicable laws and university policy.  The Copyright Policy is consistent with the Copyright Use and Ownership Policy of the University of North Carolina, enacted by the Board of Governors on November 10, 2000.

This policy applies to the faculty, staff, and students of the university.  Compliance with the terms of this policy is a condition of employment for university faculty and staff, and of enrollment for university students.  This policy is supplemental to the Copyright Use and Ownership Policy of the University of North Carolina, and is subject to any applicable laws and regulations and to specific provisions in grants or contracts that govern rights in copyrighted works created in connection with sponsored research.

The University’s Copyright Policy is included in the East Carolina University Policy Manual, the official repository of all approved policies, regulations, and rules (PRRs) at East Carolina University.

The current policy can be found on the ECU Copyright LibGuide located on Joyner Libraries website. Every semester, workshops and seminars on copyright procedures are held, and all faculty are invited to attend.

Information about patents and the technology transfer process are available at the Office of Technology Transfer web site.  Also, ECU's patent policy is published in the Faculty Manual, has recently been revised and is in final stages of the approval process and publication in the new ECU Administrative Policy Manual.  The institution’s policy is consistent with the Patent and Copyright Policies of the University of North Carolina, as published in the UNC Policy Manual.

Academic Support Services

The compliance narrative for Comprehensive Standard 3.4.9 includes a review of academic support services for distance education students. 

The Office of Continuing Studies (OCS) serves as a bridge between the student at a distance and the academic and administrative units of the university. The office respects and understands the unique demands of the lifelong learner and is committed to assuring quality, accessible programs and services. The office partners with the academic and administrative units of the university to serve DE students and faculty. Each of the university’s distance education programs begins in the academic department. Faculty members work with staff from the Office of Continuing Studies to begin the planning process. Each program has a coordinator that is a full-time faculty member. They develop a program design that includes both the instructional requirements and the academic resources available to meet the needs of a widely dispersed group of students.

OCS works to ensure that prospective students are made aware of the programs available to them, and student services to support these programs are incorporated into the planning process. The Office of Institutional Planning, Assessment and Research ensures that university surveys are made available to distance education students and that student participation is encouraged.

The ECU Office for Faculty Excellence provides faculty with resources and services that foster and support their professional success in the areas of teaching, research, and service. The OFE is committed to teaching and learning principles/initiatives designed to recognize, promote, and reward outstanding teaching, provide assessment of and growth in teaching and learning, nurture research, and invite peer collaborations and review.

Academic Computing, a division of ITCS, emphasizes the support of faculty, staff, and students using: online learning platforms, the development of online course material, multimedia development, distance education tools, Web conferencing, the IT help desk, web applications, and other tools. ITCS works collaboratively with departmental Instructional technologists to provide support of institutional online applications and infrastructure. 

Each of the university’s distance education programs begins in the academic department. Faculty members work with staff from the Office of Continuing Studies to begin the planning process. Each program has a coordinator that is a full-time faculty member. They develop a program design that includes both the instructional requirements and the academic resources available to meet the needs of a widely dispersed group of students.

In 2005 ECU participated in the Noel-Levitz Priorities Survey for Online Learners to assess the satisfaction and priorities of students in distance learning and online programs. It helped ECU examine student transactions with all major aspects of their experience, including academic, registration, and customer service.

Satisfaction with an institution included a combination of academic factors as well as areas related to other campus services. These include student interaction with faculty, as well as the service students receive from staff and administrators; the resources provided to students; policies that are in place; and students’ overall feelings about the value of the total educational experience.

Satisfaction assessment was refined by capturing students’ levels of importance (or expectations). Importance ratings provide institutions with valuable data on the areas that matter most to students.

In each of the 5 categories surveyed ECU exceeded the national norms. However, one of the benchmarks in which ECU scored lower than the national norms was: “Registration for online courses is convenient”. In fall 2007 ECU completed the Banner Student implementation in which all ECU students can now conveniently register online.

Program Length

As detailed in federal requirement 4.4, programs offered via distance education mirror on-campus programs with respect to program length.  All distance education programs (including all degrees and certificates) meet the same requirements as degrees offered on the resident campus. There are no accelerated courses or programs. 

Coherent Course of Study

As stated in the ECU Policy on Distance Education, “The faculty member teaching a distance education course shall have the same control of content and instruction as in face-to-face courses, consistent with university policies on instruction and academic freedom. Proposals for distance educations courses shall be evaluated at the department or school, college, and university level. The faculty member, unit curriculum committees, and the unit administrator play a significant role in guiding the development and implementation of distance education courses. Only those proposals demonstrating suitable content and sufficient quality and rigor are approved.

Faculty members develop syllabi for distance education courses consistent with the ECU Standards for Online Learning. These standards address learning objectives and other things necessary for student success in distance education courses. The structure of distance education courses and programs reflects consideration of the challenges of time management and the risk of attrition for students in these courses. Course design takes into consideration the need for and importance of interaction between faculty and students and among students.”

It is the policy of both the UNC System and ECU that the academic standards and quality of distance education courses and programs are consistent with and comparable to the academic standards and quality of regular, on-campus instructional activity. Every degree program offered through distance or correspondence education goes through the same rigorous multi-level approval process that on-campus programs do.  This ensures that all DE programs present a coherent course of study, compatible with the institution’s mission and based upon fields of study appropriate to higher education. The Division of Academic Affairs further assures that new and revised academic programs comply with the rules and regulations of East Carolina University, the University of North Carolina system, the regional accrediting body, and the state legislature.

East Carolina’s Policy on Distance Education, states “Programs offered via distance education shall be consistent with the mission of East Carolina University and the academic unit offering the courses or programs.  There shall be no distinctions in academic rigor or content between programs offered through distance education and those offered on campus. Development of new online programs and courses will follow the same development and approval procedures as for face-to-face programs and courses (Part V, Section III). Selection of courses and programs to be offered via distance education is the purview of the offering academic unit.  The academic units shall provide oversight of programs and courses delivered via distance education to ensure that each is coherent and complete and has learning outcomes appropriate to the level and rigor of the course or program.”

The curriculum approval process for all programs – DE or campus-based – is the same.  The process is documented in the current Faculty Manual: Part VI, Section VII, the opening statement of which is “Curriculum development is a faculty responsibility.” The admissions, degree completion, curriculum, and instructional design policies and procedures are the same as those used for traditional campus-based programs.

The curriculum development process at ECU requires academic units redesigning or proposing new courses and programs delivered via distance education to demonstrate that the units have qualified faculty members to develop, design, and teach those courses and programs.  The University Curriculum Committee (undergraduate) and Graduate Curriculum Committee both require units developing courses and programs to submit documentation from their unit heads that attest to having appropriate personnel and resources for all proposed distance education courses and programs.  Units submitting curriculum proposals are also required to indicate on the proposal forms the current and intended future modes of delivery.  

All ECU degree programs are approved by the UNC Board of Governors followed by a subsequent request to provide instruction via distance education. Appendix C: University of North Carolina Request for Authorization to Establish a New Degree Program asks “Are there plans to offer all or a portion of this program to students off-campus or online? “   and includes the following “Note:  If a degree program has not been approved by the Board of Governors, its approval for alternative, online, or distance delivery must wait until BOG program approval is received. (400.1.1[R], page 3)”

Amount and Level of Credit

All distance and correspondence education courses are awarded credit in the same manner as their on-campus counterparts.  For courses / programs without an on-campus counterpart, the material covered in the course is equivalent to similar level (i.e. undergraduate or graduate) courses in the field.  In no cases, is something other than semester credit given.

Consortial or Contractual Agreements

All consortial arrangements and contractual agreements are negotiated by the appropriate division and approved by the University attorney.  Furthermore the university maintains an inventory, including a review schedule, of all consortial arrangements and contractual agreements.  Data regarding the effectiveness of the arrangement/agreement are evaluated by the appropriate division, and an agreement renewal, with modification where appropriate, is negotiated and subsequently approved by the University attorney.

Faculty 2.8, 3.7.1, 3.7.2, 3.7.3

       An institution offering distance or correspondence learning courses/programs ensures that there is a sufficient number of faculty qualified to develop, design, and teach the courses/programs.

 

       The institution has clear criteria for the evaluation of faculty teaching distance education courses and programs.

 

       Faculty who teach in distance and correspondence education programs and courses receive appropriate training.

 

Sufficient Number of Full-Time Faculty

As described in the facilities and finances section below, faculty positions generated by DE SCHs are distributed permanently to the academic units that offer programs. Academic units proposing to offer degree programs via distance education are required as part of the on-campus and UNC GA approval process to provide extensive documentation via self-studies, internal reviews, and external reviews that the units’ faculty members are sufficient in number, hold appropriate credentials, and have the required experience to teach those proposed courses and programs.  As shown in the Full-Time/Part-Time Faculty for Distance Education Programs table, East Carolina University’s distance education programs are delivered primarily by full-time faculty members.  For the most recent academic year (2011-12), 74% of undergraduate course hours in all programs delivered online were taught by full-time faculty.  For DE graduate programs, 87% of the graduate course hours in all programs delivered online were taught by full-time faculty.

The curriculum development process at ECU requires academic units redesigning or proposing new courses and programs, including those to be delivered via distance education, to demonstrate that they have qualified faculty members to develop, design, and teach those courses and programs.  The University Curriculum Committee (undergraduate) and Graduate Curriculum Committee both require units developing courses and programs to submit documentation from their unit heads that attest appropriate personnel and resources for all new curricula, including distance education courses and programs, are available or are being acquired.  Units submitting curriculum proposals are also required to indicate on the proposal forms the current and intended future modes of delivery: face to face, distance (on-line), and/or off-campus.  Units proposing new degree programs, including those to be offered via distance education, which require UNC GA approval, are further required as part of the on campus and UNC GA approval process to provide extensive documentation via self-studies, internal reviews, and external reviews that the units’ faculty members are sufficient in number, hold appropriate credentials, and have the required experience to teach those proposed courses and programs.

The East Carolina University Faculty Manual Part VI, Section III , Distance Education Policies, clearly mandates that faculty developing, designing, and teaching distance education course and programs hold appropriate credentials and be appropriately trained in distance education technologies.  The Office of Academic Program Planning and Development, Office of Personnel Administration, Offices of the Academic Deans, and the Office of the Provost monitor compliance with these all curricular and personnel requirements.

Qualifications

All courses offered via distance education are taught by qualified, credentialed faculty approved and assigned by the unit administrator. Faculty who teach distance education courses and programs have the same requirements for academic qualifications as faculty who teach face-to-face courses.

Evaluation

The Faculty Manual part6 provides that:

DE Courses and faculty members teaching through distance education are subject to periodic review in addition to the faculty annual evaluation (at a minimum, once every three years). Faculty teaching multiple DE courses will submit only one course for review. Instruction in distance education courses shall be evaluated in a manner compatible with evaluation procedures in effect for face-to-face courses with appropriate additions consistent with the delivery method, including use of the University Peer Review Instrument for Online Learning or an approved Peer Review Instrument developed by the academic unit and approved by the Provost. Units that wish to develop their own Peer Review Instrument must use the university instrument until their own instrument is approved by the appropriate vice chancellor. Peer reviewers will be selected based on criteria determined by the faculty of the college, school or department.

Student opinion of instruction will be evaluated through an online evaluation specific for distance education courses approved by the Faculty Senate and the Chancellor and administered through the Office of Institutional Planning, Assessment and Research.

Each distance education academic degree program shall be assessed in the same manner and the same frequency as the unit's assessment of academic programs offered on campus. The unit administrator shall review assessment results with assigned faculty to facilitate the continual enhancement of the unit’s distance education program.  Documentation of compliance with these requirements is included in the compliance narrative for Comprehensive Standard 3.3.1.1 .

Appropriate Training

From The Faculty Manual part6:

Each faculty member who teaches one or more distance education course must complete a university training program consisting of five online instructional modules. Academic units that wish to develop their own training program must use the university training program until their own training program is approved by the appropriate vice chancellor.

Unit administrators are responsible for ensuring that each faculty member teaching distance education courses has the appropriate distance education training. All faculty teaching distance education courses will engage in at least one training activity each academic year that addresses advances in the methodologies and technologies used in distance education. Training is documented in the faculty annual report of each faculty member teaching one or more distance education course. The unit administrator will provide a complete list of faculty members teaching distance education courses and documentation that each faculty member has met the training requirements annually to the Provost’s office.  The Unit Summary Report:  DE Training for 2011-12 is provided.

Faculty members teaching a distance education course have access to consultation, implementation, and evaluation support from appropriate supporting units (i.e. Office of Faculty Excellence, IPAR, college Instructional Support Consultants, library services, etc). The University shall provide appropriate equipment, software, and communications access to faculty necessary to provide effective distance education. The University will ensure the availability of continuing faculty education and training to enhance proficiencies in the methodology and the technologies used in distance education.

Additionally, the University provides multiple tiers of resources to ensure that appropriate support and training are provided to faculty who teach distance and correspondence education programs and courses. Such resources that provide support and training include: ITCS (centralized computing services), decentralized Instructional Technology Consultants, Division of Emerging Academic Initiatives, and the Office for Faculty Excellence which offers a variety of presentations and workshops each semester, as well as making available online recordings of previous presentations. Current workshops are listed on the OFE web site each semester, and previous workshops are listed by semester with links to recordings or supplemental materials.  The online registration system for these workshops in SharePoint maintains a list of workshops attended by or instructed by each individual. These can be printed for an individual’s annual report.  The office provides a searchable database for previous workshops for which there are recordings or supplemental materials such as PowerPoint presentations or handouts. Workshops may be searched by "strand," topic, or key words and by year.

Many resources have been developed to support and supply faculty who deliver courses and programs online.  Faculty members teaching distance education courses have access to consultation, implementation, and evaluation support. This has resulted in a rich, comprehensive structure for support of faculty who teach online.  It is in the broad distribution of faculty support and development activities that ECU has particularly excelled.

Each academic unit at East Carolina includes Instructional Technology Consultants  (ITCs) that are embedded in the unit in order to assist and support faculty with preparing to teach online.  The role of the ITC is to promote, support, and help to integrate digital technologies into learning and teaching.  The ITC is available for consultation on course or project design and is active in the implementation of technology-supported educational initiatives through one-on-one tutoring, group workshops and seminars, or online training materials.

Technology assistance is provided through the IT Help Desk to help faculty and students troubleshoot technical issues such as connecting to the network, installing software, and accessing e-mail. Faculty can contact the IT Help Desk through a toll free number, live chat, or by submitting an online service request.   Tutorials on the tools and learning platforms are provided.   Additional assistance and training is available online through Right Answers, the university’s self service IT knowledgebase.  Training on Microsoft Office software, systems, and server-based applications is free through ECU’s designation as a Microsoft IT Academy, which also provides discounts on certification exams and guidance on certification paths.

Yearly, ITCS hosts an institution-wide technology fair, called Think-In, to encourage and share information on effective ways to use technology and enhance learning. The Think-in presenters include faculty from the colleges, Office of Faculty Excellence, Joyner Library, and Continuing Studies. Presentations from previous years’ presentations can be viewed online as further examples of methods to enhance student learning using technology.

ITCS surveys faculty, staff, and students who attend technology training to ensure the needs of all are met. Instructors improve training sessions and add new session topics as needed based on university community feedback.

Additionally, ITCS organizes focus groups (previous focus groups met in fall 2008 and spring 2009; currently conducting 2011 focus groups) and meetings targeting specific campus technology needs to obtain more detailed information. For example, ITCS staff recently met with distributed IT staff to determine specifically how to most effectively meet video production and distribution needs and classroom technology needs. As a result of these collaborative discussions, ITCS investigated two video solutions: (1) a software-only lecture capture solution with live broadcast capability that will provide distance learning students with the same information as on-campus students and allow faculty to build a library of course material that all students can access on-demand to view and review course content; and (2) a solution that will allow students to easily submit and share video files for course assignments and projects. Once solutions are determined for both needs ITCS will develop standards and training to support faculty and students. Additionally, ITCS staff are offering greater faculty support for classroom technology through a Second Life video and virtual classroom in which faculty can meet with a technology consultant.

ITCS tools and resources in support of academic research include high performance computers with specialized software; an online survey tool available to all ECU faculty, staff, and students; the SharePoint collaborative work environment; Piratedrive file storage space accessible through OneStop and the university Virtual Private Network (VPN); SAS training; access to Gartner Research; and videoconferencing technologies to connect researchers at ECU with those at external organizations.

Academic Computing, a division of ITCS offers training for faculty on how to use educational and administrative technology tools. A list of current offerings is located on their main training page. A calendar of workshops and registration is available through a training calendar. ITCS also offers departmental and one-on-one training for some technologies.

Quick Start to Online Teaching” provides an introduction to the technologies and resources that help to create collaborative, interactive and engaging learning experiences. The Quick Start presentation details the educational uses and features of a variety of technology tools to enhance online courses. It assists in the development of a technology plan to meet course objectives and identify the resources available for electronic accessibility, including examples and best practices. It identifies the resources available for Copyright, including examples and best practices.

Institutional Effectiveness 2.5, 3.3.1

Comparability of distance and correspondence education programs to campus-based programs and courses is ensured by the evaluation of educational effectiveness, including assessments of student learning outcomes, student retention, and student satisfaction.

The institution regularly assesses the effectiveness of its provision of library/learning resources and student support services for distance or correspondence education students.

Comparability of Distance and Correspondence Education to Campus-Based Programs

The Office of Institutional Planning, Assessment and Research coordinates the assessment of student learning outcomes in academic
degree programs. A standard format for reporting goals, criteria for success, results, and use of results has been implemented, and an assessment coordinator for academic affairs has been working with an assessment team, consisting of representatives from all academic units.


It is important to note that assessment of programs delivered through distance education is fully integrated into the university-wide assessment program. Since all distance education programs and courses originate in the academic unit, the academic unit develops the assessment plan for the program regardless of the mode of delivery.  The ECU Policy on Distance Education states that faculty and administrators within academic units oversee all distance education programs to ensure quality and content.  Academically, there is to be no quality and rigor distinction between courses taught on campus and those taught via distance education. All participants must meet the same course objectives and demonstrate the same learning outcomes. The curriculum and evaluation of DE courses, however delivered, are conducted under the same procedures and personnel as on-campus courses. As stated in the university’s policy on distance education, the academic unit establishes the intended learning outcomes, the means of assessment, and the criteria for success, and carries out the assessment activities for both the campus and DE programs.

Three questions frame the work of the assessment program, which is evidence-centered. This approach provides a rich context and conceptual framework for considering assessments of student learning outcomes and for asking important questions about the types of claims that can be made based on assessments.

1.               Claim: What do the faculty want or need to say about the student in the academic program?

2.              Evidence: What does the student have to do to demonstrate that he or she has the knowledge and skills claimed by the academic program?

3.               Assessment Activities and Tools: What assessment tools and/or activities will elicit the evidence that the program needs about students’ knowledge and skills?

 

In 2009, ECU invested significant resources to purchase TracDat, an SCT Software (a provider of logistics execution software) product that is being used to help manage the institutional planning and assessment process, allowing faculty and administrators to enter program and departmental strategic plans, including assessment plans, assessment methods, and outcomes, and to vertically and horizontally align their goals to other departmental, divisional, and college-wide goals. The templates assure a uniformity of reporting that simplifies collection, review, management, and utilization of data. TracDat holds all assessment plans and reports which include student learning and administrative outcomes, assessment methods, criteria for success, results, and action steps. Concise reports can be generated within the system to assist with planning and program improvement.   

 

The Student Opinion of Instruction Survey (SOIS) is administered in the fall and spring semesters to all classes with enrollment of more than five students.  Results of those surveys are delivered to individual faculty members and to their respective unit heads.  Information from those surveys is used to contribute ideas to curriculum revision, for annual evaluations of faculty members, and for merit pay considerations for those faculty members.  Likewise, the unit head has the opportunity to use the information from the survey results to effect changes in instruction or in assignment of individual courses to instructors.  An addendum is provided for all DE classes.  Results of the SOIS and comparisons of DE and face-to face instruction for the last six years are presented and discussed earlier in this narrative (see “Responsibility for curriculum”).

 

The unit academic program review consists of a self-study conducted by each program, followed by a review by a committee comprised of academicians from both within and outside the university. The usual outcomes for such reviews are the identification of program strengths and weaknesses with a determination of overall program quality and specific recommendations for improvement. Peer-review, when properly done, is a very effective way to maintain and improve program quality if the university thoughtfully responds to the recommendations for improvement as suggested by the Review Committee. In addition, the periodic review could be used as a basis for a more effective allocation of resources by using the program quality metrics as indicated by the review.

All undergraduate and graduate programs are subject to the review process, although it is recognized that some programs and/or academic units at East Carolina University hold specialized, unit-specific accreditation. In these instances, the accreditation review process substitutes for the ECU Academic Program Review process outlined in this document for each accredited program.

The principles of academic program review, established at ECU, are the following:

1. Quality enhancement is an integral component of all ECU programs and is an expected outcome of program review.

2. Program review is an ongoing process that contributes to refining ECU’s directions and program priorities, which then shape resource allocations and other governing decisions.

3. Every effort has been made to ensure that the key performance indicators used in program review are clearly stated and disseminated with sufficient lead-time so that program faculty and administrators are aware of them before the review process starts. Program faculty may develop additional criteria that are unique to an individual program.

4. Program review is intended to provide helpful information through a process that is designed to be thorough yet not excessively burdensome to faculty and administrators. In this light, all programs within an academic unit would ideally be reviewed at the same time and the data collected and reported in the academic program review process will be that which has been collected in a systematic and routine manner and specifically for the purpose of this report.

5. A university-wide organizational framework for program review has been developed and will be consistently implemented. Program review is an integral part of each program and plays a major role in the university’s ongoing assessment and strategic planning processes.

The unit academic program review at ECU consists of two interrelated activities. The first is the on-site program review, which occurs approximately every seven years for each program. The second is outcomes assessment, which is conducted on an ongoing basis. Collection and analysis of data related to outcomes, as well as resulting program changes, are reported to the program units. These two forms of program review are interrelated in two ways: (1) a description of the outcomes assessment plan and a summary of findings from previous assessments are included in the self-study for the on-site review and (2) in each report, faculty in the program are asked to record progress in implementing the action plan from the most recent on-site review.

The review process is comprised of six major components:

(1) Self-Study prepared by the unit’s undergraduate and graduate faculty

(2) On-site review by a Review Committee

(3) Review Committee’s evaluative report and recommendations

(4) Program faculty’s response to that report with prioritized resource needs

(5) Negotiation with the college/school to obtain necessary resources

(6) Action plan that provides the focus for a post-review meeting of the program chair, college/school, Graduate School, and university administrators

 

Effectiveness of library/learning resources

 

J.Y. Joyner Library serves students enrolled in courses and degree programs from East Carolina University’s Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences and the Colleges of Business, Education, Fine Arts and Communication, Health and Human Performance, Human Ecology, and Technology and Computer Sciences.  Joyner Library began assessing areas related to distance education in 2007.  That year, ECU’s distance education students represented the population studied in the LibQual +Survey (LibQual Assessment 2007; LibQual 2007 Highlights).  This instrument measures the service quality of libraries based upon feedback solicited from the target population.   Information Control, Affect of Service, and Library as Place are the three areas assessed by this instrument. The results are used to identify best practices, analyze deficits, and reallocate resources to improve service quality. LibQual+ was repeated in 2009 (2009 LibQUAL+ Survey Results: DE vs On-Campus); the population included all faculty, staff, and students under the Academic Affairs unit.  Distance students were categorized as DE/online users so their information could be analyzed separately (Joyner Library Assessment Documents).   Additionally, the Joyner Library Reference Department conducted a pilot program for assessing DE library instruction sessions during 2009-2010.  Information gathered is currently being analyzed and revisions to the program will be made.  Basic statistics are being kept as to the number of reference questions posed by distance students, the number of orientation sessions conducted, the number of instruction sessions taught or instructional materials provided, and the number of consultations given. Also, plans for other types of assessment will be devised during 2010-2011.


Laupus Library serves the Brody School of Medicine, the College of Nursing, the College of Allied Health Sciences, and the School of Dental Medicine.  Laupus Library assesses all instructional sessions lasting roughly more than 10 minutes in length.  The evaluations are discussed by the Education Committee and are used as the foundation for informal peer review of instruction.  In addition, the evaluations are also used to help plan future instruction for all library users. 
Laupus Library Class Evaluation Forms are online or can be printed for large orientation classes.

 

ITCS employs multiple measures to continually gauge and analyze the quality and appropriateness of services to improve ECU’s offerings to faculty, staff and students.  ITCS administered a campus technology survey in 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2011 in order to obtain feedback from faculty, staff, and students on (1) levels of satisfaction with ITCS services, systems, and applications; (2) use of technology tools and systems; and (3) technology and training needs. ITCS then incorporates this feedback in future planning and implementation of technologies to support academic, research, and business needs. Use of results is included in the compliance narrative.

In addition, ECU participates in statewide efforts to evaluate the effectiveness of distance education programs in the UNC systems. For example, the North Carolina General Assembly directed the Program Evaluation Division to compare the startup and ongoing costs of distance education versus on-campus instruction throughout the University of North Carolina (UNC) System. The Final Report to the Joint Legislative Program Evaluation Oversight Committee concluded:

       Compared to on-campus courses, distance education courses cost more overall to develop but cost about the same to deliver.

       Distance education increases access to education.

       Technology has changed delivery of instruction in every setting.

       Wide variation in distance education capabilities among the UNC campuses creates inefficiencies across the UNC System.


Library/Learning Resources 2.9, 3.8.1, 3.8.2, 3.8.3


Students have access to and can effectively use appropriate library and learning resources supporting distance learning activities.

Access is provided to laboratories, facilities, and equipment appropriate to the courses or programs

Two libraries serve all students enrolled at East Carolina University.  J.Y. Joyner Library serves students enrolled in courses and degree programs in East Carolina University’s Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences and the Colleges of Business, Education, Fine Arts and Communication, Health and Human Performance, Human Ecology, and Technology and Computer Sciences.  The William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library serves students in the Brody School of Medicine, the College of Nursing, the College of Allied Health Sciences, and the School of Dental Medicine.  Both libraries provide special services for distance education students and routinely assess those services.

Off-campus access is available to all students using library resources remotely by authentication through a proxy server.  The students authenticate themselves by using their ECU Pirate ID and passphrase.  Further information regarding this service is available on the “Connect to the Library’s Electronic Resources from Home” page.  Both libraries provide library orientations and research assistance to distance education students.  Library orientations are provided through online tutorials, videos, and research guides (LibGuides) which introduce services to distance students and instruct students in the use of specific library research tools.  These resources are available 24 hours a day 7 days a week.   Assistance with research is provided through instant messaging, text messaging, e-mail, telephone, or in-person.  Distance Education students are able to request one-on-one consultation services provided through instant messaging, phone, or in-person.  Students may also have contact with liaison librarians who partner with faculty to provide instruction, synchronously or asynchronously.

Joyner Library currently subscribes to more than 450 databases containing indexes to periodical articles.  Many of these resources offer full-text access to individual articles.  A listing of these electronic databases may be found online.  Laupus Library currently offers an extensive collection of online databases and collections.  Many of these resources offer full-text access to individual articles and books.  A listing of the Laupus electronic resources may also be found online.  If students wish to determine if one of the libraries has full-text access to a particular journal title, students may use the E-Journal/E-book Portal.

Students enrolled in distance education courses may check out books from both Joyner and Laupus Libraries as well as obtain print or online journal articles.  Further information about obtaining materials at a distance is available through the Interlibrary Loan/Document Delivery Departmental websites of each library: Joyner Library, Laupus Library.

J.Y. Joyner Library houses and provides access to a physical collection of over 1.9 million volumes, over 48,000 serials (print and online), over 500,000 e-books, more than 24,000 items in its digital collection, and one million federal documents (print and online). The library provides access to more than 400 electronic databases made available through several consortia and through its own subscriptions. All together, the electronic database collections provide access to over 76,000 full-text journal titles. Resources can be accessed through the Joyner Library web site.

Other collection features include:   a non-book media collection with over 32,000 items in various formats, a teaching, resources and curriculum materials collection, a collection dedicated to North Carolina materials, a Special Collections Department that houses over 11,000 linear feet of manuscripts, university archival materials, various ephemera, and a rare book collection.  The library has also established an institutional repository which includes electronic theses and dissertations of ECU students and the scholarly output of both ECU students and faculty members.

Students enrolled at East Carolina University as distance education students are provided special services to ensure access to Joyner Library’s physical and electronic collections.  A Distance Education Coordinator is employed to facilitate the delivery of library services and plays an active role in shaping services available to distant users. Many librarians and staff members within the library work directly with distance students as services are provided.  Information about distance education services can be found on the Joyner Library Distance Education web page.

Librarians from Joyner Library conduct orientation and instruction sessions for distance education students using a variety of methods.   The Distance Education Coordinator provides open orientation sessions to students via web conferencing software.   Orientation sessions are also offered to faculty members to provide information about library services which can be passed along to students in distance courses.  Library instruction sessions are provided via pre-recorded video, online web conferring software, resources embedded in the course management system, and in-person at the request of the teaching faculty member. 

The library also provides online tutorials, videos, and research guides, LibGuides, which introduce services to distance students and instructs students in the use of specific library research tools.  These resources are available 24 hours a day 7 days a week and can be located at:

Tutorials             

Video (not linked – available upon request)

LibGuides

 

To support ECU’s distance learning students, Joyner Library offers reference services in the use of library resources for learning and research.  Reference services have been expanded to include online options as well as more traditional means of communication.  Assistance is provided through instant messaging, text messaging, e-mail, telephone, or in-person consultations.  The Distance Education Coordinator is available to provide additional assistance when needed.  Instant messaging and text messaging reference services are available 97 hours per week during fall and spring semester, 82 hours per week in the summer, and approximately 59.5 hours per week during breaks.  Students may request assistance using the “Ask a Librarian” web page.

Joyner Library is open 111.5 service hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, with extended hours during final exam periods and abbreviated schedules of approximately 83.5 hours during summer sessions and 50 hours during breaks. 

Resources provided to distance education students for their use and success include learning platforms such as Blackboard, Moodle, Centra, and Second Life, where students access course content, post assignments, and communicate with instructors and peers.  Students can access selected software through the Virtual Computing Lab (VCL) that provides 24x7 free access to software from any location students have access to the Internet or get software quickly and easily from the ECU Software Download site. Faculty and students creating websites for academic purposes can do so through the MyWeb application that allows them to create, publish and manage websites and blogs themselves and control the private or public viewing of these sites.  Using iWebfolio, an electronic portfolio system, students can document their academic careers at ECU. Students’ portfolios may include a variety of different artifacts: text files, multi-media files, experiences, reflections, journal entries, work experience, skills, learning objectives, learning goals, and more. 

Academic and Student Support Services 2.10, 3.4.9, 3.3.1.3

Students have adequate access to the range of services appropriate to support the programs offered through distance and correspondence education.

Students in distance or correspondence programs have an adequate procedure for resolving their complaints, and the institution follows its policies and procedures.

Advertising, recruiting, and admissions information adequately and accurately represent the programs, requirements, and services available to students.

Documented procedures assure that the security of personal information is protected in the conduct of assessments and evaluations and in the dissemination of results.

Students enrolled in distance education courses are able to use the technology employed, have the equipment necessary to succeed, and are provided assistance in using the technology employed. 

Range of Services to Support DE

Up until the late 1990s, off-campus students were served by a designated outreach unit.  The Office of Continuing Studies (OCS) assessed the needs of the region; scheduled the courses; built the admissions folders; hired faculty; advised, registered, and billed the students; sold texts on-site, and recorded grades.  Since that time, with the advent of distance education, students away from the campus are now integrated with campus students.

DE students are an integral part of the mission of the university beginning with the university’s motto Servire, to serve.  Rather than develop alternative systems for DE students, ECU has developed web-based processes that support all students, both DE and campus.  Careful planning and dedicated resources have permitted ECU to move from paper-based processes to a system where all ECU students can interact with the university in the same manner.

Most dramatic has been the campus-wide effort to make distance education programs a mainstream activity of the university and of the academic departments/schools rather than functioning as separate programs maintained by a separate administrative unit.  ECU recognizes the inherent strength of this model and has diligently pursued the development and support of distance education programs as a core component of its educational and service missions.  Under this model, the Office of Continuing Studies assumes an active role in assisting with logistical issues, student support and recruitment, marketing, and reporting/planning support while academic departments/schools maintain responsibility for program faculty, curriculum, and program integrity.  All activities are supported by a core university commitment to ensure the funding resources, infrastructure, and support systems required to maintain quality programs.

OCS serves as a bridge between the student at a distance and the academic and administrative units of the university. OCS is charged with assisting ECU students away from the campus by identifying the nature of this specific student population’s concerns and marshaling the resources of multiple offices to provide students with general information, policies and procedures, and referrals to other support services on campus. The needs and challenges of DE students away from the campus are far more complex and their expectations in regard to service are often at a professional level demanded each day in their career settings.

From admission to graduation, ECU provides a system of support services that acknowledges the challenges students away from the campus have in meeting the responsibilities of their families and careers while pursuing academic endeavors.  ECU’s mission guides the institution to assess each individual situation and provide situation-specific responses to student needs. These services provide a safety net for DE students as they engage in online programs:

       Enrollment Services

       Admissions

       Registrar

       Financial Aid

       Cashiers Office

       Academic Advising

       Tutoring

 

 

       Proctoring

       Writing Lab

       Dean of Students Office

       Career Center

       Center for Counseling and Student Development

       Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities

       Department for Disability Support Services


Communication


ECU has a comprehensive communication plan of student-directed email messages with information, available services and reminders of important dates, registration reminders, and reassurances that help is available.


The office provides a dedicated email address and a toll free number staffed by student service specialists who can reassure students and assist in navigating online resources. The specialists can assist with general program information, procedural issues, as well as link students to resources across the campus.  Specialists provide a single point of contact for ECU students who are unable to come to the campus.

The Online Distance Education Options for Adult Learners website provides a central repository for services and information for DE students. Orientation and online tutorials are available to assist new and current DE students. “Options for Adult Learners,” a semi-annual newspaper insert, is distributed in newspapers across North Carolina.

Enrollment Services

The ECU OneStop portal allows users (students, faculty, staff,) to personalize a single interface for access to internal campus resources. Students log in to OneStop using a PirateID and passphrase. Tools available in OneStop include student course registration and tuition payment, faculty access to class rosters and submission end-of-semester grades, and a campus-wide discussion board. Students can also access OneStop from a variety of mobile devices. 

Admissions

The undergraduate office of admissions and the graduate school have developed systems that allow both campus-based and DE students the opportunity to apply, interact, and monitor their admissions process via a web-based system.

Registrar

Registration, drops, withdrawals, graduation applications, and requests for transcripts can all be accomplished online in OneStop. Students and advisors can assess degree evaluations from their Banner Self Service account on OneStop.

Financial aid

Students are encouraged to apply online; information, forms, and access to key personnel are available at online.

Cashiers office

Tuition statement eBill notifications are sent to students and/or authorized user(s) by EMAIL. Via OneStop, Students can set up authorized users to access account information and recent statements, and to make payments.


All registered students are mailed a HigherOne card for refund preference selection. Student refunds can include excess Financial Aid or credits for dropping a class.

The Office of Continuing Studies also maintains a business office that can assist DE students with university-related financial matters.

Academic Advising Services

Academic advising is required of all students prior to registering for courses. Advising is provided within each college by professional advisors, faculty advisors, or a combination. Students are encouraged to consult with advisors regarding course/degree requirements, correct sequencing of courses, requirements for specific majors and graduation, campus rules/regulations, and campus resources. Advisors are available to DE students through email, phone, and, when possible, web conferencing.

Students experiencing academic difficulty

Starfish is an early alert tool that is accessed through the Blackboard course management system in order to support student academic success at East Carolina University. Through Starfish, faculty can inform students of academic performance within a course and connect students to appropriate support resources. Features include: 

 

The Pirate Tutoring Center (PTC), in addition to its on-campus services, provides online study skills workshops, and support for selected courses.  


Distance Education Proctoring Center


The ECU DE Proctoring Center is an approved site in the UNC Online Proctoring Network.
  This site serves distance education students (who need to make an appointment to take proctored exams), and faculty members (who need to set up proctored exams for distance education courses). The Center serves faculty and students throughout the UNC system.  Information about the UNC Online Proctoring Network is available online.

 
East Carolina’s Online Writing Lab (OWL)


OWL provides DE students with both instruction and support as they progress through the writing process. The lab grants DE students the vital opportunity to e-mail trained consultants about questions or problems during any stage of the writing process. Rather than acting as a professional proofreading service, the OWL consultants respond to specific questions and provide instruction and trouble-shooting techniques designed to improve students’ overall writing skills.


Technology

Technology infrastructure and support for distance education courses is provided through many programs, services and resources. 

The IT Help Desk assists students and faculty troubleshoot technical issues such as connecting to the network, installing software, and accessing e-mail. Distance education students can contact the IT Help Desk through a toll free number, or live chat, or by submitting an online service request.   Tutorials on the tools and learning platforms are provided on the Learning Technologies for Students web page. Additional assistance and training are available online through Right Answers, the university’s self-service IT knowledgebase (ask.ecu.edu). Training on Microsoft Office software, systems, and server-based applications is free through ECU’s designation as a Microsoft IT Academy, which also provides discounts on certification exams and guidance on certification paths.

Recommendations for student computers are provided through the ACE program - a partnership among ITCS, Dowdy Student Stores, Lenovo, and Apple.  This program provides recommendations in regard to specific computer configurations required by ECU colleges and schools to complete coursework and projects.  The competitive contract and support provided reduce the overall cost for students.  Support is provided through both the university and vendors, to ensure that students receive consistent, timely, and accurate support.  

ITCS organizes focus groups (previous focus groups met in fall 2008 and spring 2009; ITCS also conducted focus groups in 2011) and meetings targeting specific campus technology needs to obtain more detailed information. For example, ITCS staff recently met with distributed IT staff to determine how most effectively to meet video production and distribution needs and classroom technology needs. As a result of these collaborative discussions, ITCS investigated two video solutions: (1) a software-only lecture capture solution with live broadcast capability that will provide distance learning students with the same information as on-campus students and allow faculty to build a library of course material that all students can access on-demand in order to view and review course content; and (2) a solution that will allow students to easily submit and share video files for course assignments and projects. Once solutions are determined for both needs, ITCS will develop standards and training to support faculty and students. Additionally, ITCS staff are offering greater faculty support for classroom technology through a Second Life video and virtual classroom in which faculty can meet with a technology consultant.

ITCS tools and resources in support of academic research include high performance computers with specialized software; an online survey tool available to all ECU faculty, staff, and students; the SharePoint collaborative work environment; Piratedrive file storage space accessible through OneStop; the university Virtual Private Network (VPN); SAS training; access to Gartner Research; and videoconferencing technologies to connect researchers at ECU with those at external organizations.

Resources provided to distance education students for their use and success include learning platforms, such as Blackboard, Moodle, Centra, and Second Life, where they access course content, post assignments, and communicate with instructors and fellow students.  Students can access selected software through the Virtual Computing Lab (VCL) that provides 24x7 free access to software from any location students have access to the Internet, or get software quickly and easily from the ECU Software Download site: download.ecu.edu.  Faculty and students creating Web sites for academic purposes can do so through the MyWeb application that allows them to create, publish and manage Web sites and blogs themselves, and control the private or public viewing of these sites. Through the OneStop Web portal, faculty and students can add/register for classes, check grades, and much more.  Using iWebfolio, an electronic portfolio system, students can document their academic careers at ECU. Students’ portfolios may include a variety of different artifacts: text files, multi-media files, experiences, reflections, journal entries, work experience, skills, learning objectives, learning goals and more. 

Other tools that aid in the success and use of resources include communication tools, where students can communicate with professors and peers through their ECU Outlook Live e-mail accounts. This e-mail system, powered by Microsoft, also provides a chat component that allows students to communicate with instructors using Microsoft Communicator. In addition, Outlook Live also enables students to use Microsoft Office Web Apps for free, and provides students with online storage space for course-related and personal files, photographs, and more.  Additional resources include piratedrive space for file storage and SharePoint collaborative workspace.

Technology assistance is provided through the IT Help Desk to help students and faculty troubleshoot technical issues such as connecting to the network, installing software, and accessing e-mail. Distance education students can contact the IT Help Desk through a toll free number, live chat, or by submitting an online service request.   We offer tutorials on the tools and learning platforms provided on the Learning Technologies for Students web page.  Additional assistance and training is available online through Right Answers, the university’s self service IT knowledgebase (ask.ecu.edu), training on Microsoft Office software, systems, and server-based applications is free through ECU’s designation as a Microsoft IT Academy, which also provides discounts on certification exams and guidance on certification paths.

Recommendations for student computers are provided through the ACE program - a partnership among ITCS, Dowdy Student Stores, Lenovo, and Apple.  This program provides direction in regard to specific computer configurations required by ECU colleges and schools to complete coursework and projects.  The competitive contract and support provided reduce the overall cost for students.  Through this program, a limited number of computers are donated and made available to students demonstrating financial need via financial aid and an application process.  Support is provided through the university and vendors, to ensure students receive consistent, timely, and knowledgeable support.  

Complaint Procedures

The Office of the Dean of Students is the central campus resource for addressing student complaints and inquiries, including those of distance education students. The office provides guidance to students who believe that there is reason to make an inquiry or complaint. The Dean of Student's office can assist by helping students determine the nature of the complaint and/or the appropriate faculty or staff member or department to discuss/receive the initial complaint. All issues and concerns must be filed through this office.

East Carolina University has adequate procedures for addressing written student complaints and demonstrates that it follows those procedures when resolving student complaints. Procedures for student complaints and inquiries are publicly posted for students on the Dean of Students website. Non-academic student concerns are registered through the procedures also outlined on that site. The linked example of the process for addressing a written non-academic student complaint demonstrates this procedure.

Student academic concerns may be expressed through the office of the designated dean. Procedures for integrity of scholarship, for grades, and for classroom discipline are outlined in the Undergraduate and Graduate catalogs. The description and procedures for Academic Violations are outlined in the Academic Integrity Policy in the Student Handbook. Records addressing academic complaints are housed in the academic dean’s office related to the student’s program.

Students, faculty, and staff may alert the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities to any concerns regarding student behavior and/or register a written complaint. Policies governing student behavior include the Student Code of Conduct and Residence Hall Policies. These policies include student rights, freedoms, and responsibilities, and present ECU’s code of conduct and university disciplinary policies and procedures. Parking and transportation ordinances are located on the Parking and Transportation Services web page along with the online system for submitting parking appeals.

To register anonymous complaints regarding any matter at the university, the Report A Crime and ECU Cares programs are available to students through the East Carolina University Policy Department and Dean of Students Office. The on-line reporting system cannot track the person or address from where the complaint is made. The reporting system is monitored daily and is provided to afford students an outlet for reporting incidents when they feel intimidated or are reluctant to register complaints through more formal channels.

Financial Aid appeal policies are located on the Office of Student Financial Aid webpage.

The University Discrimination and Harassment Policies are administered through the Office of Equal Opportunity and Equity. Grievance procedures and the Office for Equity and Diversity grievance form are posted online. The Office of Equal Opportunity and Equity is the location for the Title IX Coordinator, and the Dean of Students Office is the location for the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for student complaints. In respect to discrimination and harassment complaints made against students, the Associate Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs/Dean of Students is responsible for the process and procedures.

Advertising, recruiting, and admissions information

The Department of University Publications has primary responsibility for admissions and student recruitment materials. All student recruitment pieces must be created or approved by the Department of University Publications in keeping with guidelines for writing and editing publications. All publications listing courses and degree requirements are reviewed by the Division of Academic Affairs and the Graduate School for accuracy and appropriate content.

The Office of Continuing Studies maintains and updates program and course offerings on external web sites. The information on these web sites details the university’s programs, admission information, and registration information.  Each semester, these sites are reviewed and updated as well as being subject to revisions as requested by the academic departments.

The “Online Distance Education Options for Adult learners" website serves as the central source for programs and services for distance education students.  

The marketing plan for East Carolina University’s Distance Education Program incorporates the six major advertising media:  newspapers, magazines, radio, television, outdoor media, and the Internet.  Recruitment and admission materials are reviewed by University Marketing and Academic Affairs for accuracy and appropriate content.

In the university’s role as the largest distance education provider in North Carolina University System, the Division of Continuing Studies maintains and updates program and course offerings for a wide range of web sites. The information on these web sites detail the university’s programs, admission and registration information as well as individual contacts. Each semester these sites are reviewed and updated as well as frequent revisions as requested by the academic departments.

       The University of North Carolina Online

       Army Centralized Tuition Assistance Management (CTAM)

       SREC Southern Regional Electronic Campus

       Model Teachers Education Consortium

       DANTES (Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Educational Support)

       Sloan Consortium

       Gateway Technology Center


Newspapers throughout North Carolina with a readership of 10,000+ are used to distribute the Options insert, an 8 page two-color tabloid,  that helps to promote ECU’s position as the state’s leader in distance education.  Online degree and certificate programs are listed, along with basic instructions to apply and register.  Continuing and Professional Education programs are also highlighted.  The tabloid continues to be effective in disseminating information about DE programs to the citizens of North Carolina.  Options is also distributed to community colleges and LEAs.


Display advertising is also purchased in several newspapers in major military markets as outreach, another effective means to communicate our DE programs. 

Magazines provide another venue for showcasing our DE programs. “Our State” Magazine most recently provided a full color spread of East Carolina’s DE programs.

During the marketing campaign, radio advertising concentrates on Eastern North Carolina and the Triangle Area including Raleigh and Durham, and Greensboro. 

Television is scheduled on network and cable channels in Eastern North Carolina, the Triangle, and Triad. 

Outdoor Media are utilized in major military and urban markets.

The Internet advertising utilizes web based entities such as Peterson’s, GetEducated.com, ECUPirates.com, News & Observer.com, WRAL.com, and WTVD.com.  

DE staff are often invited to participate in Education fairs held at businesses and industries throughout North Carolina and the Options tabloid and DE fliers are disseminated to participants. 

All of the marketing efforts that are used, point to the Options website where individuals can find information concerning admissions, available online programs and services.

Documented procedures to assure the security of personal information

Student personal information is protected through a variety of measures, including the administration of policy and security practices that govern the PirateID and passphrase associated with accessing ECU’s OneStop Portal, the online system that houses student grades. The PirateID is sent to the home address of the student in a letter from ECU Admissions that also includes information on the structure of the passphrase. Within approximately two weeks, the student receives their BannerID in a separate mailing from ECU Admissions.  This distribution method increases the security of each student’s personal information.  Students are required to have a strong passphrase that is resistant to “hacking”, and they must reset their passphrase every 90 days and not reuse the account’s previous six passphrases (Passphrase Resources). When students use their PirateID and passphrase to access information through OneStop and the university’s learning management system, Blackboard, their login credentials are encrypted for additional security.

East Carolina University protects the security, confidentiality, and integrity of its student records by adhering to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Following FERPA, East Carolina University and the Office of the Registrar do not provide confidential information pertaining to students without one of the following: (1) Written consent from student. This is done electronically through ECU OneStop. Students will log in with their Pirate ID and Passphrase and click on BUCKLEY FORM to give authorization for third parties (including parents) to access their student record; or (2) Visual confirmation, (by way of a copy of an income tax form) that the parent(s) claim the student on the most recent tax return. All financial information may be suppressed, but the student's name and social security number must be listed under the dependents section of the most recent Federal Income Tax Form 1040 or 1040A. 

In addition to complying with FERPA, ECU also follows appropriate policies regarding the handling and purging of student records. The university’s business manual details a comprehensive records retention and disposition schedule that adheres to the University of North Carolina (UNC) records retention and disposition schedule.

East Carolina University (University) recognizes the importance of student record security in an environment where digital records form the bulk of student records and therefore require diligence to protect the security, confidentiality,   integrity and availability of student records. The University employs strict security measures, policies, standards and guidelines in our ongoing effort to protect information resources, including student records.

The Academic Computer Use Policy and University’s Student and Staff Computer Use Policy govern users of University computer systems, which include hardware, data, software and communication networks.  The Information Security website is the source for users of the University computer systems on required information security policies, standards and guidelines designed to protect information resources. The Information Security website also contains information about sensitive data protection, password management, encryption, identity theft, security awareness as well as responses to frequently asked questions.

The relevant state laws such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), Gramm-Leach-Bliley are available online on the IT Security Compliance and Regulations web page.  Personally Identifiable Information (PII) contained in student records is governed by the University Policy on Social Security Numbers (SSN) and Personally Identifiable Information. The University’s Information Security Officer chairs the University Identity Theft Protection Committee (ITPC), which oversees ECU's compliance with this policy in regard to the collection, segregation, disclosure and security of SSNs and PII and the development of related policies. The ITPC is comprised of representatives from each division, as well as members from the Office of the University Attorney, the CIO, the Office of Internal Audit, and the Office of Enterprise Risk Management.    It is the policy of the University to protect the confidential nature of social security numbers, and toward that effort the University discontinued the use of the SSN as an individual’s primary identification number and replaced it with a unique identifier.

All mission-critical University systems, including student records, are maintained on network servers in the University’s enterprise data center. The enterprise data center employs state of the art layered security controls and physical access controls.  Mission-critical systems are backed up nightly to ensure availability of student records for data recovery and business continuity. A comprehensive Disaster Recovery Plan containing the necessary instructions, policy, organization, tasks, and responsibilities required to ensure the University is prepared to respond should an emergency or disaster occur that would affect our Information resources is tested and updated annually. Annual IT Risk Assessments are performed to identify threats to information resources and additional controls required to mitigate those threats.   

Individuals requiring access to student information must login through a secure login process with a unique UserID and password to our Banner Application Administrative Student system.  Users must attend FERPA training and request access via Banner Security Request Application.  All access changes require a Banner Security Request form. Terminated employees access is removed upon termination (Account Termination Policy) and access reviews are conducted semi-annually.  The password must conform to the industry and University standards (Passphrase Resources) established in regard to length, type, and number of symbols and characters. The user is authenticated and granted appropriate level of access to the data dependent upon job responsibility.  Access by students to these services is controlled via the secure login profile established by each eligible user.  The profiles and unique identifiers are maintained in a secured Banner Application database that employs industry standard security controls. Users of information systems are prohibited from accessing data or programs for which they are not authorized. 

Ability to Use Technology Employed

Survey results and feedback from committees ensure the ongoing quality of programs and services, and the access and use of technology.

Each semester Distance Education students rate their satisfaction with the available technology resources and they rate their course using the Student Opinion of Instruction instrument.  The number below indicates the % who rated the listed service as a 6 or 7 on a 7 point scale, 7 is equal to strongly agree.  Survey results indicate that over 90% of the students agreed, they had adequate hardware, software knowledge.  Eighty -five percent consistently agreed the DE instruction was an effective means of learning and over 90% would take another course.  Additionally, 85% of student agreed the technology support was adequate, and 88% and greater indicated the ECU hardware was adequate.  All of this data strongly indicates students are able to use the technology, the technology is satisfactory, and they did not experience technical difficulty. 

Questions

Spring 2009

Fall 2010

Spring

2011

Hardware Knowledge Adequate

92

92

91

Software Knowledge Adequate

90

90

90

Internet Knowledge Adequate

94

93

93

Technology Support Adequate

86

85

85

ECU Hardware and Equipment Adequate

90

88

88

Little Technical Difficulty

88

86

87

Effective Means of Learning

85

85

85

Would you take another Distance Education Course?

94

93

93

 
ITCS employs multiple measures to continually gauge and analyze the quality and appropriateness of services to improve our offerings to faculty, staff and students.

ITCS administers campus technology surveys every few years to obtain feedback from faculty, staff, and students on their (1) satisfaction with ITCS services, systems, and applications; (2) use of technology tools and systems; and (3) technology and training needs, and incorporates this feedback in future planning and implementation of technologies to support academic, research, and business needs. 

Below are the key results of the 2011 Faculty and Staff IT and Student IT Survey:

The faculty and staff IT survey was distributed in Spring 2011. There were 1060 respondents to the survey. Eight % of the respondents were administrators, 50% were faculty, and 42% were staff. The student IT survey was also distributed Spring 2011. There were 1274 respondents to the survey. Twenty-two percent were freshmen, 18% Sophomores, 20% Juniors, 24% Seniors, and 17% graduate or PhD students.  Fifty –five percent of the students received instruction face to face, 19% online, and 26% were a combination of face to face and online instruction.

Survey Dimension

Faculty/Staff 2011

Students 2011

Blackboard Satisfaction

87%

92%

Piratedrive Storage Space Satisfaction

83%

85%

E-mail Satisfaction

94%

86%

Campus Computing Labs Satisfaction

81%

84%

Classroom Technology

79%

85%


Three very important over arching questions were asked on the survey:

Survey Dimension

Faculty/Staff 2011

Students 2011

% satisfied with the research resources and support provided

81%

83%

% respondents who thought ECU’s Technology Services and Resources are important

94%

90%

Overall Satisfaction with IT Services and Resources

89%

86%


Below are a few actions taken in response to recommendations from faculty, staff, and students:

       Provided greater Macintosh support – Macintosh computers were purchased for the IT Help Desk staff so they can become familiar with the systems and provide more in-depth assistance through first-line Help Desk support

       Implemented Blackboard Mobile – Blackboard Learn Mobile were implemented to allow students and instructors to interact with Blackboard on their Android, Blackberry, iPod Touch, iPhone, and iPad device

       Provided students with Microsoft Office software – As of August 2011, Microsoft Office software became available for students, free of charge, through a download or media received through the mail

Institutional Planning, Assessment and Research (IPAR) includes technology questions on the annual Graduating Senior Surveys and the Graduate Student Exit Survey administered to ECU students.

Graduating Senior Survey:  The % below indicates the % who rated the listed service as excellent or good:

Questions

2007-2008

2008-2009

2009-2010

2010-2011

Access to the internet

96

96.8

97.5

95.6

Hours of Operation for computer center, labs, and help desks

90.6

89.1

87.7

89

Access to up-to-date facilities

95

95

93.2

94.3

Access to trained staff for help

81.4

82.8

81.8

84.6

Technology Training Services

81.1

81.8

79.9

84.5

Technology Services Overall

93.2

93.9

93

93

 
GRADUATE Student Exit Survey

Yearly, a graduate student exit survey is administered yearly, the % below indicates the % who rated the listed service as excellent or good:

Questions

2005-2006

2007-2008

2009-2010

2010-2011

Access to course materials through the Internet

94

95.8

97.2

97.2

The Help Desk was available when needed

88.7

89.7

92

92

On-campus computer facilities were available when needed

87.4

91.7

91

93.9

Technology training was available when needed

83.7

86

89.2

89.2

Technology services overall

91.9

93.1

95.6

95.6

Effectiveness of information technology in improving my learning experience

N/A

N/A

96.6

87.2

 
Facilities and Finances 2.11.1, 2.11.2, 3.11.3

Appropriate equipment and technical expertise required for distance and correspondence education are available.

The institution, in making distance and correspondence education courses/programs a part of its mission, provides adequate funding for faculty, staff, services, and technological infrastructure to support the methodology.

Adequate Equipment and Technical Expertise

An appropriate technology infrastructure is provided by the institution to support distance education.  The university recognizes the vital need for a robust and reliable network and consistently researches and implements infrastructure upgrades and improved processes to ensure network integrity and improve network uptime.   Additionally, the official content management system for the University operates on state-of-the-art hardware, which assures a high level of quality with minimal downtime. 

To maintain ECU’s success, the ITCS Governance structure provides a mechanism for discussion, oversight, evaluation of services, and planning of technology infrastructure to support distance education, and to achieve ECU’s strategic directions in order to support the mission of the institution.

Appropriate equipment is provided by the institution to support distance education.  The University’s primary distance education offering is delivered through the BlackBoard Learning Management.   We have a total of 4 physical application servers (Sun Sparc Enterprise T5240) each has 2 Processors (8 Core Ultra Sparc T2+) running at 1.2 Ghz and capable of 128 simultaneous processing threads and 128 GB of RAM.  Each of these application servers are divided into 3 Logical Domains each (separating our production, development/pilot, and restore environments).  Course content is stored on our NAS device and we are currently using 1.5TB of the allocated 2.0TB.  The Database Servers consist of 2 Sun Sparc Enterprise M5000 servers.  Each has 8 Processors (4 Core Sparc64 VII) running at 2.4 Ghz and capable of 64 simultaneous processing threads and 128 GB of RAM.  Each M5000 is partitioned into 2 domains (one for Production use and one for Development/Pilot use).  The databases are configured using Solaris Clustering to provide failover capability.

Another primary tool to support the distance education experience is Centra, a hosted solution used for web conferencing.  This hosted web conferencing program provides a virtual classroom, enabling  a group of people to interact with one another in a virtual online meeting environment. Centra can be accessed "live" anytime from anywhere attendees have access to a computer and an Internet connection. All meetings using Centra are automatically recorded, so those unable to make the live meeting are able to playback the meeting at a later time. Our platform is hosted by Saba, which provides us with the ability to hold an unlimited number of meetings 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Centra’s server currently stores recordings for over 7,000 meeting events and accommodates over 8,000 active users. Saba provides toll free end user technical support for faculty, staff and students Monday – Friday, 7:00 AM to 12:00 AM and Saturday & Sunday, 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM.

In March 2010, ECU employed Blackboard Consulting Services to perform a Performance Audit and Tuning Engagement on ECU’s Production (Blackboard 8) and Development/Pilot (Blackboard 9) environments.  The outcome of the engagement affirmed that ECU’s production system was well designed, well-tuned, and capable of supporting our students.

Because of the importance of this environment to ECU, ITCS has taken a “High Availability first/disaster recovery last” approach.  Each server is built with component redundancy for all processors, memory, power supplies, network cards, fiber cards, and related components.  Multiple fully redundant systems power the database and applications tiers.  The redundant servers are split between ECU’s primary (Cotanche) and secondary (GE99) data centers, and are connected via multi-pathed replicated storage also split between both data centers.  Sun Clustering is used to provide automatic failover for the database tier, while load balancing provides seamless redundancy for the applications tier.  The design ensures that ECU can maintain BlackBoard services in the event of an entire data center failure.  In addition, full system nightly backups are maintained offsite, and recovery procedures are routinely tested should they be needed. 

Through ECU’s nearly Petabyte of storage, adequate storage and backup is available for academic websites, student work, and student and faculty blogs.  There are also several resources available for the sharing of video and other image files.  The primary resource for sharing student work is iTunes and a winmedia streaming server.  Both of these resources enable students and faculty to upload unlimited amounts of video for use in courses. 

The primary video infrastructure used to record lectures is through Mediasite. ECU’s Mediasite 5.5 setup is based on a high availability load balancing infrastructure: the institution currently runs two application servers and one video content server that facilitate all of the capture from 35+ recorders to 13 departmental sites for both on-demand and live-streaming presentations.  All sites require Active Directory authentication or local user authentication to view information and sensitive material. 

The main internet connection for ECU is provided by the North Carolina Research and Educational Network (NCREN).  The connection to NCREN is a 1 gigabit per second connection to the NRCEN Remote Point of Presence (RPOP) which is connected to the NCREN backbone by two 1-gigabit-per-second connections utilizing diverse paths back into the NCREN network.   

To ensure success, adequate funding (through an education and technology student fee) is provided for the technology infrastructure for distance education.  This fee funds Blackboard, Centra, Second Life, various retention tools (e.g., Starfish, Yammer), MediaSite, Moodle, the Virtual Computing Lab, Help Desk Support, software downloads (e.g., Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), Statistical Analysis System (SAS), Minitab, Mathematica, SAV, Nvivo), and other services that support distance education.  Students receive an ECU PirateID that provides an e-mail account; access to web-based course management systems (Blackboard and Moodle), Web space, and electronic file storage space; and access to various electronic information and databases. Assistance with computer configurations, software interfaces, and technology problems is provided through ECU’s Help Desk and the ACE Student Computing Support Center. 

We restrict access for departmental admins to parts of the server that impact actual connection settings and server configurations.  The video server contains all of the storage for the department’s site presentations. We currently have 6TBs of storage that all thirteen sites share.  The video server is running Windows Media Server that has connections to each sites content folders and will stream the presentation as it is requested. Presentations can be viewed in two ways either live or archived. This service will take the schedules and push it down daily or as changes are made to the schedule settings. This allows a redundancy for presentation recording even in the event the server is unavailable due to a network connection issue.

Information Technology & Computing Services (ITCS) is a centralized technology organization led by a Chief Information Officer, reporting to the Vice Chancellor of Finance and Administration. There are 193 positions (10 vacant) including professional staff in the fields of networking, security, systems, operations, instructional technology, programming, desktop support, communications, training, and administration. An Organizational Chart of ITCS can be found at http://www.ecu.edu/itcs/itcs_orgchart_files/itcsorgchart.htm.  

Academic Computing, a division of ITCS, emphasizes the support of faculty, staff, and students using online learning platforms, the development of online course material, multimedia development, distance education tools, Web conferencing, the IT help desk, web applications and tools. ITCS works collaboratively with departmental Instructional technologists to provide support of institutional online applications and infrastructure.  ITCS provides qualified staff to support technological infrastructure through national and regional searches to hire the most qualified personnel, following Office of State Personnel guidelines.  ITCS staff has a myriad of nationally recognized advanced degrees and certifications in a variety of areas, such as ISCA security and governance, Cisco Networking, A+ hardware, Microsoft Products, and Red Hat. Training is provided to staff through online training tools, workshops, and conferences.

Adequate funding for faculty, staff, services, and technological infrastructure

Adequate funding for distance education programs in regard to faculty, staff, services, and the technological infrastructure is assured by the University of North Carolina Semester Credit Hour Enrollment Change Funding Model.  Faculty positions are assigned to the university based on increases in DE enrollment and are submitted bi-annually to the UNC General Administration. The instructional salary amount plays a key role in the calculation of instructional costs in enrollment funding. The salary component is the product of the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) faculty teaching positions derived from the calculations in the Current Instructional Position Factors--UNC Enrollment Change Funding Model multiplied by the budgeted average teaching salary. This determines the number of teaching positions required for the projected enrollment change and the direct salary costs related to those positions.

The salaries of faculty are only part of the cost of operating academic departments. The “other instructional costs” component is intended to provide funding for fringe benefits of the faculty members, salaries and benefits of other personnel in the academic departments (e.g., clerical personnel, laboratory supervisors, etc.), office operating expenses (telephone charges, photocopies, office supplies, etc.), travel, equipment, and other similar costs. The total faculty salary cost is multiplied by a factor expressed as a percentage, e.g. 44.89%. The salary component and the other instructional costs are combined to yield total academic requirements. This amount is the basis for calculating the remaining percentage components in the model.

The SCH formula also provides funding for additional library resources related to enrollment growth. This step in the formula calculation is intended to provide campuses with funding that can be used for salaries for additional library personnel; acquisition of books, periodicals, serials, or on-line services, and any other related purpose as is necessary as institutions increase enrollments. The total academic requirements (as determined in previous steps for instructional salaries and other instructional costs) is multiplied by the library funding factor of 11.48%. The result is the additional allowance for library services related to enrollment change.

The UNC General Institutional Support (GIS) formula component is designed to provide funding for a wide variety of functions that support the instructional mission of the constituent institutions, of which ECU is one. Some of the types of activities included in the GIS category are: academic support services, student services, institutional support, campus administration, and physical plant operations. The calculation requires multiplying a specific percentage rate for GIS (54.05%) times the “Total Academic Requirements.”

Investments in planning and collaboration have enabled ECU to be well prepared to move forward with enhanced program offerings and new initiatives once state funding is made available.  Distance education funding has risen steadily in the preceding 10 years.  This major infusion of resources has generated faculty positions as well as operational funding critical to program maintenance as well as future program development and support.  While a substantial portion of the funding goes directly to the academic units  offering distance education programs, resources are also directed toward critical student and institutional support functions including library resources, infrastructure enhancements, technology support, instructional technology consultants, course management systems, course development, and professional development.  

New Federal Requirements  4.8.1, 4.8.2, 4.8.3

An institution that offers distance or correspondence education demonstrates that the student who registers in a distance or correspondence education course or programs is the same student who participates in and completes the course or program and receives the credit by verifying the identity of a student who participates in class or coursework by using such methods as (1) a secure login and pass code, (2) proctored examinations, or (3) new or other technologies and practices that are effective in verifying student identification.

ECU utilizes a web-based authentication system to determine that the student registered in a distance education course is actually the student who participates in and receives credit for the course. The authentication system requires that the student securely log on to ECU's network using a unique user ID (Pirate ID), and with a unique and user-determined passphrase

New students receive one communication with both their PirateID username and ECU ID number.  Once received, new users log in to the PirateID (PID) auto-registration system and follow the step-by-step screens to activate their PirateID account, create a unique passphrase, and set up their authentication questions.  Once activated, users are able to check their ECU e-mail and access OneStop, Blackboard, and other institutional online systems. 

The Password Expiration Policy states that students are required to have a strong passphrase that is resistant to “hacking;” they must reset their passphrase every 90 days and not reuse the account’s previous six passphrases. Students are notified via e-mail or system messaging at least 3 times in the two weeks prior to passphrase expiration.  When students use their PirateID and passphrase to access information through OneStop and ECU’s learning management system (Blackboard), their login credentials are encrypted for additional security.

DE Students must verify their identity with the ID and password to participate in electronic systems at ECU. The delivery of instruction, group activities, individual student materials from faculty, and assessment activities require every student to log in to the university learning platform (Blackboard) and other systems using their unique secure passphrase.

Faculty may choose to include proctored exams in their courses. To support this effort, ECU played a leadership role in the establishment of a state-wide proctoring network. A Distance Education Proctoring Center is available to students enrolled in DE courses at East Carolina University and at other constituent institutions within the University of North Carolina system.  This site serves distance education students who need to take exams and faculty members who need to set up proctored exams for Distance Education courses.  This service requires verification of student identify in assessment and evaluation.

Written Procedure for Protecting the Privacy of Students enrolled in DE Programs

East Carolina University, hereafter ECU or the institution, has a written procedure for protecting the privacy of students enrolled in distance and correspondence courses or programs.  The institution’s FERPA Regulation includes the following: 

    5.4              Procedures for Protecting the Privacy of Students Enrolled in Distance or Correspondence Courses or Programs

 

5.4.1           East Carolina University recognizes the importance maintaining the privacy and security of student identity and student records in an environment of computer networked, digital records storage. ECU is diligent in protecting the security, confidentiality, integrity and availability of all student records including student identity. The University employs strict, standard security measures, policies, standards and guidelines in our ongoing effort to protect information resources, including student records. Student personal information is protected through a variety of measures, including the administration of policy and security practices that govern the PirateID and passphrase associated with accessing ECU’s OneStop Portal, the online system that houses student grades, Blackboard, Centra, and other services that support the educational process at ECU. Students are required to have a strong passphrase that is resistant to “hacking.” Students must reset their passphrase every 90 days and not reuse the account’s previous six passphrases. When students use their PirateID and passphrase to access information through OneStop and the university’s learning management systems, including Blackboard and Centra, their login credentials are encrypted for additional security. All mission-critical University systems, including student records, are maintained on network servers in the University’s enterprise data center. The enterprise data center employs state of the art layered security controls and physical access controls. Users of information systems are prohibited from accessing data or programs for which they are not authorized. 

 

As described fully in the compliance narrative for comprehensive standard 3.9.2, The Privacy of Student Educational Records Policy ensures that the institution administers student educational records in accordance with the provisions of FERPA. In compliance with FERPA, this process is done electronically through ECU OneStop. Students log in with their Pirate ID and Passphrase and click on BUCKLEY FORM in order to establish their preferences about access to student records. The policy also protects the confidentiality of personally identifiable information in student records. The policy is published in the Faculty Manual, Part VI, Section IV.II The undergraduate and graduate course catalogs describe the academic regulations that address the use of student records (including both grades and transcripts).  Academic standards are described in the Faculty Manual, Part VI.

In addition to complying with FERPA, ECU also follows appropriate policies regarding the handling and purging of student records. The university’s business manual details a comprehensive records retention and disposition schedule that adheres to the University of North Carolina (UNC) system records retention and disposition schedule.

The Academic Computer Use Policy and ECU’s Student and Staff Computer Use Policy govern users of the institution’s computer systems (including hardware, data, software and communication networks).  The Information Security website is the source for users of ECU’s computer systems to access published information security policies, standards, and guidelines. The Information Security website also contains information about sensitive data protection, password management, encryption, identity theft, and security awareness as well as providing responses to frequently asked questions.

The relevant state laws, such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), and the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, are available online on the IT Security Compliance and Regulations web page.  Personally Identifiable Information (PII) contained in student records is governed by the University Policy on Social Security Numbers (SSN) and Personally Identifiable Information.  The institution’s Information Security Officer chairs the University Identity Theft Protection Committee (ITPC), which oversees ECU's compliance with this policy in regard to the collection, segregation, disclosure, and security of SSNs and PII and in regard to the development of related policies. The ITPC is comprised of representatives from each division, as well as members from ECU’s Office of the University Attorney, the Chief Information Officer (CIO), the Office of Internal Audit, and the Office of Enterprise Risk Management.  It is the policy of the institution to protect the confidential nature of social security numbers, and toward that effort, ECU discontinued the use of the SSN as an individual’s primary identification number and provided each member of the institutional community with a unique identifier.

All mission-critical ECU systems, including student records, are maintained on network servers in the institution’s enterprise data center. The enterprise data center employs state-of-the-art layered security controls and physical access controls.  Mission-critical systems are backed up nightly to ensure availability of student records for data recovery and for business continuity. A comprehensive Disaster Recovery Plan containing the necessary instructions, policies, organization, tasks, and responsibilities required to ensure that ECU is prepared to respond should an emergency or disaster occur that would affect information resources is tested and updated annually. Furthermore, annual IT Risk Assessments are performed to identify threats to information resources, and additional controls required to mitigate those threats.   

Individuals (such as faculty and staff) requiring access to student information must log in through a secure login process with a unique UserID and password to ECU’s Banner Application Administrative Student system.  Users must attend FERPA training and request access via the Banner Security Request Application.  All access changes require a Banner Security Request form. Terminated employees’ access is removed upon termination (Account Termination Policy) and access reviews are conducted semi-annually.  The user password must conform to the industry and ECU standards established in regard to length, type, and number of symbols and characters (Passphrase Resources). The user is authenticated and granted appropriate level of access to data, dependent upon job responsibility.  Documentation Sources:

The institution has a written procedure distributed at the time of registration or  enrollment that notifies students of any projected additional student charges associated with verification of student identity (if a charge is assessed).

To ensure that students are aware of the possibility that proctoring fees may be charged, ECU utilizes the following message, “At this time the university does not impose any additional charges specifically related to verification of student identity. Students enrolled in distance education classes in which proctored exams are required may, however, incur charges levied by the proctoring site chosen. Fees for these services are listed on the UNC Online Academic Services website which schedules proctored examinations.”  This notice can be found in the online undergraduate and graduate catalogs and tuition and fee brochure. This notification is also posted on university Cashiers website that is viewable by students and the “Options for Adult Learners” website. At the time of registration a notification “pop up” box appears to inform the student that additional charges may be levied.

In summary, as documented throughout the Compliance Certification Document, East Carolina University ensures that distance education courses and programs comply with the Principles of Accreditation and the SACS Policy Statement on Distance and Correspondence Education.

 

Documentation

Reference Title

Location

2009 LibQUAL+ Survey Results: DE vs On-Campus

Distance Learning LibQUAL comparison

Academic Affairs Organizational Chart

AcademicAffairs

Academic Computer Use Policies

Academic Computer Use Policies

Academic Integrity Policy

Academic Integrity Policy

Account Termination Policy

Account Termination Policy

Appendix C: University of North Carolina Request for Authorization to Establish a New Degree Program

400-1.1.1.5G_Append_C_-_Effective_052312

Ask a Librarian

Ask a Librarian - Joyner Library

Assistant Vice Chancellor for Emerging Academic Initiatives

AsstVCEmergAcadInit_pd

Associate Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs/Dean of Students

920302 - Associate Vice Chancellor and Dean of Students

Banner Application Administrative Student system

Banner Portal

BOT Minutes

BOT11-21-08

Comparison of Face-to-Face(FF) and Online (DE) SOIS Summary Course Rating Means

SACS-LinnerSOIS-Table1a-Final-V2

Comparison of Face-to-Face(FF) and Online (DE) SOIS Summary Course Rating Means Matched by Instructor and Course Number

SACS-LinnerSOIS-Table1b-UG-GR-Final-V2

Comparison of Selected Face-to-Face (FF) and Online (DE) Course Rating Means by Semester and Term

SACS-LinnerSOIS-Table2-Final-V2

Comparison of Face-to-Face and Online Instruction in Terms of Ratings of Instructional Quality from the Graduate Student Exit Survey

SACS-LinnerSOIS-Table3-Final-V2

Comparison of Face-to-Face and Online Instruction in Terms of Ratings of Instructional Quality from the Graduating Senior Survey

SACS-LinnerSOIS-Table4-Final-V2

 

Connect to the Library’s Electronic Resources from Home

Connect to the library's electronic resources from home

Copyright Policy

Faculty Manual part7

Current Instructional Position Factors—UNC Enrollment Change Funding Model

Cost Catagories SCH per Instructional Position from Enrollment_Manual_Oct_2010-2

Current Workshops

OFE Summer 2011 Workshops

Dean of Students Website

Dean of Students website

Department of University Publications

University Image

Deputy Title IX Coordinator

Dean of Students Title 9

Distance Education and Learning Technology Committee

de

Distance Education Proctoring Center

DE Proctoring Center

E-Journal/E-Book Portal

ECU E-Journal and E-Book Portal

ECU Cares

ECU Cares

ECU Copyright LibGuide

Copyright LibGuide

ECU Faculty Manual, Part VI, Section III

Faculty Manual part6

ECU Policy on Distance Education

Faculty Manual part6

ECU Records Retention and Disposition Schedule

ECU Records Retention General Schedule

ECU Software Download Site

SitePages - Home

ECU Standards for Online Learning

Online Standards

ECU Tomorrow: A Vision for Leadership and Service

ECU Tomorrow One Century

Electronic Databases

Electronic Databases

Faculty Manual, Part VI

Faculty Manual part6

Faculty Manual, Part VI, Section VII

Part V - Curriculum Development

Faculty Manual, Part VI, Section III.VI

Faculty Manual part6

Faculty Manual, Part VI, Section III.IV

Faculty Manual part6

Faculty Manual, Part VI, Section IV.II

3.9.2 Student Privacy Policy - Privacy of Student Educational Records

FERPA Regulation

2012_05_22__FERPA-PRR_2

Full-Time/Part-Time Faculty for Distance Education Programs

DE FT_PT Faculty by Program 07_30_2012

Graduate Catalog

grad

Graduate Catalog (Proctoring Fee Notification)

Grad - Distance Education

Graduate Catalog (Student Records)

grad - student records

Grievance Form

EDC - Submit a Grievance

Guidelines for Writing and Editing Publications

4.6 writing-editing

Information Security Website

ITCS Security Information

Instructional Technology Consultants

Instructional Technology Consultants

IT Security Compliance and Regulations web page

ITCS Compliance and Regulations

ITCS Governance Structure

IT Governance Structure

ITCS Training Calendar

ITCS Training Calendar

ITCS Training Page

ITCS Training

Joyner DE Tutorials

Joyner Library Tutorials

Joyner Library Assessment Documents

Assessment Documents - Joyner Library

Joyner Library Distance Education Web Page

Joyner Distance Education

Joyner Library Interlibrary Loan

Interlibrary Loan - Joyner Library

Joyner Library Website

Joyner Library - ECU

Laupus Electronic Resources

Laupus Library Electronic Resources

Laupus Library Class Evaluation Form

Laupus Library Class Evaluation

Laupus Library Document Delivery

Laupus Library Document Delivery

Learning Technologies for Students

Learning Technologies for Students

LibGuides

Joyner LibGuides

LibQual Assessment 2007

LibQual_2007

LibQual 2007 Highlights

LibQUALHighlights2007_Full1[1]

Likelihood of Obtaining a Degree without an Off-Campus Program

SACS-DEprog-Table5

Likelihood of Obtaining a Graduate Degree without an Off-Campus Program

SACS-DEprog-GSES-Table6

 

Noel-Levitz Priorities Survey for Online Learners

Noel Levitz Institutional Summary Priorities-08012012112751

Office for Faculty Excellence

3.7.3 OFE Web Page

OFE Online Registration System

3.7.3 OFE Workshop Registration

OFE Workshops by Semester

Previous OFE Workshops

Office of Student Financial Aid webpage

Office of Financial Aid - Appeals Process

Office of Technology and Transfer Web Site

Technology Transfer Policies

OneStop

ECU OneStop

Options for Adult Learners

Options

Options for Adult Learners (Proctoring Fee Notification)

Tuition - Online Distance Education Options for Adult Learners

Organizational Structure

ECU

Parking and Traffic Citation Appeals

Parking Appeals

Parking and Transportation Ordinances

Parking and Transportation Ordinances

Parking and Transportation Services web page

About ECU Parking

Passphrase Resources

Passphrase Resources

Password Expiration Policy

Password Expiration Policy

Patent Policy

Faculty Manual part7

Patent and Copyright Policies, University of North Carolina, Policy Manual

500_2

PirateID (PID) Auto-Registration System

Passphrase Maintenance - Login

Privacy of Student Educational Records Policy

3.9.2 Student Privacy Policy - Privacy of Student Educational Records

Quick Start to Online Teaching

QuickStart to Online Teaching

Report a Crime

Report-A-Crime

Residence Hall Policies

Residence Hall Policies

SACS Policy Statement on Distance and Correspondence Education

Resource Manual, Appendix C

State-wide Proctoring Network

Statewide Proctoring Network

Student Code of Conduct

Student Conduct Processes

Student Complaints and Inquiries

Student Inquiries and Complaints

Think-In

2011 Think In

Title IX Coordinator

Title IX Coordinator

Tuition and Fee Brochure

Fees_Main_Campus_Spring_2012

UNC Online Academic Services website

Find a Proctor

UNC Online Proctoring Network

UNC Online Academic Services

UNC Records Retention and Disposition Schedule

UNC General Schedule Introduction

Undergraduate Catalog

ugrad

Undergraduate Catalog (Proctoring Fee Notification)

Ugrad - Distance Education

Undergraduate Catalog (Student Records)

ugrad - student records

Unit Summary Report: DE Training

2011-2012 Summary Annual Reports--Distance Education aug

University Cashiers website

Cashiers website

University Discrimination and Harassment Policies

Sex-Harass-Policy-REV

University Policy on Social Security Numbers (SSN) and Personally Identifiable Information

SSN Resource Home Page

University Publications

University Publications

University Staff and Student and Staff Computer Use Policy

Staff and Student Computer Use Policy

Written Non-Academic Student Complaint Example

Example of Student Inquiry and Non academic complaint